Author Topic: Sausage Making  (Read 1915 times)

lezelle

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Sausage Making
« on: February 25, 2020, 12:09:06 »
Hi Ya, Not sure if this is the right place but here goes. I have spent the last hour and a half making some sausages. I had the skins in the freezer and got my Kenwood chef out that I bought 4 years ago or more. I used pork belly, no extra fat, minced apple, didn't realise how much juice there is in one apple. Used medium hole gauge but it kept blocking so upped to large holed gauge, what a difference, The skins were a pain to set up but I got there. I know I should of put spices in but have left that to see how they turn out. I will not use pork belly again as I found it so stringy and kept blocking the strainer. I am a newbie to this and as the weather is rubbish and I am retired I thought I would give it a go and do more sausage making etc. If any one has some advice for a beginner then please I am up for all I can get. I enjoyed playing and the sausage doesn't look to bad. Left them to dry a bit then will string them. I will let you know how good or bad they are. But any tips, advice most welcome. The paperwork that came with the mixer was not good and comprehensive enough for me. I did find out I had the cutter the wrong way round which didn't help. I made some burgers once and all liked them. I enjoy cooking and this is another string to my bow. Cheers all.

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Sausage Making
« on: February 25, 2020, 12:09:06 »

Yorkshire Lass

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Re: Sausage Making
« Reply #1 on: February 25, 2020, 12:24:58 »
Gosh you're brave making your own sausages. I'm sure they'll be delicious.  Sorry I can't advise but you look as though you've suceeded. Looking for something to do this morning I,ve just made some parsnip and apple soup with a hint of chilli which we'll have for lunch

lezelle

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Re: Sausage Making
« Reply #2 on: February 25, 2020, 12:37:27 »
Hi Yorkshire lass, Parsnip and apple soup, I make carrot and coriander and considering parsnip. Swap recipes with you. Happy eating

Obelixx

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Re: Sausage Making
« Reply #3 on: February 25, 2020, 12:48:26 »
Having found some very rare lamb's liver in the SM and cooked it for dinner last night (Venetian liver and onions with sage) our sweet potato tagine I had planned has morphed into soup for lunch.

I bought a sausage making kit in 1990 cos the sausages on offer were so poor but then we moved to Belgium where there is no rusk and none of the mechanically recovered crap and loads of variety.  Not as good a range here but still proper meat but I think you have to mix pork shoulder with pork belly to get a good sausage and then herbs, spices, leeks, onions, apples as you see fit.
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lezelle

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Re: Sausage Making
« Reply #4 on: February 25, 2020, 16:39:05 »
Hi Ya, Well couldn't resist and fried one up in the pan using some fat free spray thing. I must say it tasted fine to me. I think it could of done with some onion and pepper. Still it has given e some hope. Watching a film it was said to use shoulder rather than belly pork. Will have a look and see. I must admit I threw a lot of fat away as I am not that keen on fat anyway and was surprised at the amount there was. Will try soe tomorrow with chips and a bit of brown daddies sauce. Happy eating yum yum

hippydave

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Re: Sausage Making
« Reply #5 on: February 25, 2020, 16:48:23 »
You did remove the skin from the belly didnt you, I leave about 1/4" of fat on and then chop and mix with shoulder before putting it through. These were my last attempt using my own pork.
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Jeannine

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Re: Sausage Making
« Reply #6 on: August 21, 2020, 07:07:37 »
I make my own and use part belly and part shoulder.I also make my own Pork pie as it is not avaiable here. If you have your sausage meat ready after seasoning, just take a good teaspoon, flatten it an  fry it, then you will be able to adjust herbs etc to how you like the, I like majoram in mine, plus other things
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Peanuts

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Re: Sausage Making
« Reply #7 on: August 21, 2020, 11:01:59 »
Not made sausages myself, but our butcher friend makes  superb sausages, all meat, no additives, except herbs and spices.  Soooo good. So different from UK supermarket sausages, and even farmers' market ones.  So keep experimenting!
But we do make our own pâté in bulk, and so mince our meat.  To stop it blocking up the mincer I always cut the meat up in smaller pieces first, maximum a couple of cms.  Otherwise it is really difficult.

Obelixx

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Re: Sausage Making
« Reply #8 on: August 21, 2020, 14:51:50 »
Just before we moved to Belgium in 1991 I actually bought a sausage making kit because I was fed up with the offerings locally and in the SM.  Never used it.

Belgian sausages, as in France, are proper meat and fats with herbs/onions/spices but no rusk and no mechanically recovered crap.  Butchers have their own recipes and in supermarkets you can see the butchery team mincing pork and flavourings for the SM's own brand.   There are seasonal flavourings too especially for black and white pudding - cabbage, onion, grapes, leeks, apples - tho I still prefer the irish version with some oatmeal in or a Bury pudding.
« Last Edit: August 21, 2020, 14:54:28 by Obelixx »
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BarriedaleNick

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Re: Sausage Making
« Reply #9 on: August 21, 2020, 15:54:01 »
I think a lot of it is just trial and error and you get better over time.  The Kenwood does tend to get blocked a bit so the meat is best chopped first and different cuts do tend to behave differently so try a few different mixes.  The best bit is that you can add what you want or leave them vanilla...
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ancellsfarmer

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Re: Sausage Making
« Reply #10 on: August 21, 2020, 20:32:58 »
I think a lot of it is just trial and error and you get better over time.  The Kenwood does tend to get blocked a bit so the meat is best chopped first and different cuts do tend to behave differently so try a few different mixes.  The best bit is that you can add what you want or leave them vanilla...
To the best of my recall, Kenwood offer three grades of coarseness in their mincer plates, start with the coarse and re-mince with the finer, to suit your taste. Also, the pork will cut better slightly frozen, that is not quite de-frosted.Its best to keep the minced meat cool at all times.Rusk/or breadcrumb may be incorporated at the second pass, this absorbs the juices and makes for cleaner handling. if using real casings, supplied salted, remember to soak until fully pliable, to reduce splits. Its nearly sixty years since my butchers' shop upbringing, how time flies!
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