Author Topic: Chillies Ahoy  (Read 50827 times)

BarriedaleNick

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Re: Chillies Ahoy
« Reply #60 on: March 24, 2010, 12:49:24 »
I saved some seeds from bought chillies and have just planted them, does this work or is it a waste of time
should I buy some more.
any views ?

It works fine as long as the seeds have been dried for a day or so...
You may get some surprises when they mature (if they do) as they may not come true from seed.  If you want to know exactly what you will get then buy standard seeds but saving seed is great fun and can result in some good finds..
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Re: Chillies Ahoy
« Reply #60 on: March 24, 2010, 12:49:24 »

greenhousegirl

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Re: Chillies Ahoy
« Reply #61 on: March 24, 2010, 12:53:12 »
Oh I like suprises so I'll stick with it and see what happens
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Vinlander

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Re: Chillies Ahoy
« Reply #62 on: March 31, 2010, 23:26:48 »
I saved some seeds from bought chillies and have just planted them, does this work or is it a waste of time
should I buy some more.
any views ?

Generally I find bought chillies carry seeds that make identical plants and fruits - much more identical than my own seed-saving efforts because I grow several varieties close to each other and commercial growers do the opposite - big time!

The scare stories say F1 varieties can produce very variable seeds but this assumes that the parents were wildly different. Not always the case.

Commercial growers may use F1s more than I do but I've yet to find any shop fruit that produces the divergent offspring you hear about in the scare stories.

The packet of "Black Cherry" tomatoes I was sold by T&M in '07 was at least 100x more divergent than anything I've bought from the greengrocers... about 20% came out as Black Krim beefsteaks.
With a microholding you always get too much or bugger-all. (I'm fed up calling it an allotment garden - it just encourages the tidy-police).

The simple/complex split is more & more important: Simple fertilisers Poor, complex ones Good. Simple (old) poisons predictable, others (new) the opposite.

NICI

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Re: Chillies Ahoy
« Reply #63 on: April 23, 2010, 12:32:38 »
I agree with Rhubarb too
My boyfriend and his dad are MAD for chillis and both complained mine werent hot enough last year
Whats the hottest variety you have would love to get some from your website 

carosanto

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Re: Chillies Ahoy
« Reply #64 on: June 01, 2010, 18:33:15 »
My husband, a chilli freak, never showed any inerest in gardening until he bought some Bhut Jolokia seeds, having heard they were the hottest ever.  I've grown chillis before,so under my guidance, we now have 10 perfect tiny plants. But I've got cold feet, having read these are many thousand times hotter than anything else with a Shu of 1,000,000 and professional growers handle them all kitted out like beekeepers!.

I've even heard that from just one ingested seed you could get anaphalactic shock because it is so hot!  Am I being alarmist? should I wear gloves when potting them on, and - honestly - how would I use them in cooking?

Any help would be appreciate, as my husband is so proud of his little plants!

Reards, Caro
If you always do what you always did you'll always get what you always got!

Sparkly

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Re: Chillies Ahoy
« Reply #65 on: June 01, 2010, 18:43:53 »
I grew these. I don't think you need to wear gloves when potting on, but I would very careful when chopping up the actual chillies. Also use sparingly, even if you like hot stuff!  ;D

chappy

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Re: Chillies Ahoy
« Reply #66 on: July 01, 2010, 19:58:51 »
Hi All,

I've been growing chillies for a few years now with varying success.  But one thing I would like to crack.

I absolutely love green Jalapeno's. I buy jars and jars of the pickled or brined ones. :D

But, I've tried growing them 3 years running now and at best I may get one, plant, produce once chilli.  But rather than the "thick walled" chillies you get in the jars, they are usually thin walled.

So firstly, why would the walls not thicken?

Secondly, if Jalapeno is a bit of a bugger to grow.  Can you recommend a similar tasting, strength and wall  thickness which grows easily?  I have a poly greenhouse and have heated propogators to start them earlier but they never quite work out.

Also what would you consider the best chilli to use in curries like Jalfrezi, where you add fresh sliced chillies at the last moment.

chappy

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Re: Chillies Ahoy
« Reply #67 on: July 01, 2010, 20:00:53 »
Sorry Biscombe, I just realised I should have started a new thread.  Delete my last two from here if you can.

AceOfSpades

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Re: Chillies Ahoy
« Reply #68 on: August 26, 2010, 09:34:23 »
Hi - I'm new here ;D and a new gardener (compared to many).  Just thought I would shre my excitment at growing my 1st ever chillie.  PIcked this morning :O)  I woudl post a pic .. but I can't work out how to do this?? ???

aireeonree

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Re: Chillies Ahoy
« Reply #69 on: July 04, 2013, 08:49:25 »
Hi - I have only just got an allotment (literally yesterday) and have some chillis growing (from seed) on window sills in pots. But my cats keep nibbling the leaves off! Even when i cover them in cling film they rip it off to get at the leaves! So 1) are cats attracted to chillis? and 2) any tips for transferring said chillis to the allotment? 

gazza1960

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Re: Chillies Ahoy
« Reply #70 on: July 04, 2013, 09:39:02 »
Im no Chilli specialist but the chillies ive grown from seed and potted on in doors are taken to the plot and left in them,I use 8 ins x 8 ins pots approx and either put them in the polly or greenhouse and take them out on sunny days and put them back in the evening,I don't seem to gain any extra fruits
by planting them in the dirt so have quite happily left them as pot plants.

I recall we used to put scented soaps and bags of pot pourri hanging on our growing frame indoors and I can only think the aromas used to keep them away as Bee Gizmo and Alfie didn't eat any of the seedlings in pots that I can remember,,,,,,not sure that its any good for them anyway.

Good luck with your growing.

Gazza

Jayb

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Re: Chillies Ahoy
« Reply #71 on: July 05, 2013, 12:00:38 »
Hi Aireeonree, Welcome to A4A and congratulations on getting your allotment  :icon_cheers:

What variety of chillies are you growing and what sort of size are they at the moment, some are more suited to being grown in a pot than others. Sorry no idea why your cats have developed a  taste for your chilli plants, you could try distracting them with a pot of cat grass?
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aireeonree

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Re: Chillies Ahoy
« Reply #72 on: July 05, 2013, 14:45:50 »
thanks. will have to check varieties (as was a gift box xmas present) and think 1 of them is a 'chocolate' chilli
no idea why the cats like them and not the other plants in the house either!

Uncle_Filthster

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Re: Chillies Ahoy
« Reply #73 on: July 07, 2013, 00:08:43 »
I dunno about cats but dogs certainly like a chilli.  A mate of mine had to give up growing them as his dog was so partial to a chilli that he used to eat them off the plant so my mate never got any fruit to use himself!  :toothy10: :tongue3:

My dog leaves them alone (does what she's told) but she does love a bit of curry no matter how hot it is.