Author Topic: Garlic  (Read 679 times)

lezelle

  • Acre
  • ****
  • Posts: 368
Garlic
« on: July 18, 2021, 11:53:14 »
Hi Ya, I have grown garlic this year and quite pleased with the results. I was looking at it and there is more than I will use and was wondering if I can grow it from my own saved bulbs. Has anyone done it and how did it turn out? cheers all

Allotments 4 All

Garlic
« on: July 18, 2021, 11:53:14 »

Tee Gee

  • Hectare
  • *****
  • Posts: 6,722
  • Huddersfield - Light humus rich soil
    • The Gardener's Almanac
Re: Garlic
« Reply #1 on: July 18, 2021, 17:09:09 »
Yes, I did it regularly, providing it is free of disease! 

See here;https://www.thegardenersalmanac.co.uk/Content/G/Garlic/Garlic.htm

Tiny Clanger

  • Half Acre
  • ***
  • Posts: 182
Re: Garlic
« Reply #2 on: July 19, 2021, 14:50:38 »
Hi Iezelle,  I've successfully  grown bulbs from saved garlic. I don't grow a lot of saved cloves as there are so many different ones I've never tried.

 Had to scrap mine this year due to rot. I have it in patches all over the plot. Unlucky this year.  Glad to hear yours have done well. X
I expect to pass through this world but once; any good thing therefore that I can do, or any kindness that I can show to any fellow creature, let me do it now; let me not defer or neglect it, for I shall not pass this way again.

Beersmith

  • Hectare
  • *****
  • Posts: 668
  • Duston, Northampton. Loam / sand.
Re: Garlic
« Reply #3 on: July 19, 2021, 21:19:12 »
A perfectly sensible thing to do, but as TeeGee has emphasised use only healthy disease free bulbs, and in my opinion decent sized cloves.  It can be an excellent economy measure too as garlic sets can be expensive from some suppliers.

 I have done it myself with good results but as I have a source of good sets at reasonable prices I do not do it every year.  I tend to monitor how my stocks are keeping and how much has been eaten as autumn approaches, and act accordingly.
Not mad, just out to mulch!

Plot22

  • Half Acre
  • ***
  • Posts: 158
Re: Garlic
« Reply #4 on: July 20, 2021, 07:04:14 »
I have done it for several years now . Last year white rot decimated all my stock EXCEPT it did not touch the elephant garlic. I had to buy all new stock except the elephant. Same again this year lost most of the softneck that I had purchased but the elephant is fine. I have kept the elephant for a number of years starting off with just 4 cloves this year I set 60 so I am wondering if it has built up a resistant to the white rot?

Tee Gee

  • Hectare
  • *****
  • Posts: 6,722
  • Huddersfield - Light humus rich soil
    • The Gardener's Almanac
Re: Garlic
« Reply #5 on: July 20, 2021, 10:08:56 »
I have only had white rot once and it was after a particularly hot spell.
On seeing the comments above I have been theorising and come up with this thought;

When onions swell they form a sort of basin/pan below them and if you water your onions quite often this basin/ pan remains quite moist relative to the soil around it.

Meaning the base of the owning is cooking( boiling) due to the hot weather and it is this action that initially causes the base of the onion/s to soften making them more susceptible to disease.

One of my pet hates is watering and the lack of this on my plots may have helped in keeping me free of white rot

We have certainly been getting spells of very hot water in the last few years at the time the opinions are swelling is a reason or just a coincidence?

Over to you...........

gray1720

  • Hectare
  • *****
  • Posts: 521
Re: Garlic
« Reply #6 on: July 20, 2021, 11:33:57 »
Unfortunately for the theory, I get white rot, and I water as little as possible (living three miles away, working full time and having a home garden too, I just can't water everything every day - especially as we have to pump water up from wells) - I water the planting hole, plant, water in, and then it has to get on with it. Mind you, this year, it's either been too wet or too dry, too hot or too cold, and my poor onions that looked so good when I put them out now mostly look brown bread... and the least said about the garlic the better.
My garden is smaller than your Rome, but my pilum is harder than your sternum!

Plot22

  • Half Acre
  • ***
  • Posts: 158
Re: Garlic
« Reply #7 on: July 20, 2021, 12:01:12 »
I have heard of Tee Gee's theory before as I have said on a previous post I have grown my onions in the same bed white rot free for the past 2 years. I have not watered for some weeks now irrespective of the weather and touch wood they are looking ok. It maybe that I am mainly growing Golden Bear which I had white free success with last year or maybe it is the watering theory but rain is forecast for most of next week which is fine for most crops but perhaps not so fine for my onions. I will try to post the results when I harvest them.

Tiny Clanger

  • Half Acre
  • ***
  • Posts: 182
Re: Garlic
« Reply #8 on: July 22, 2021, 11:15:15 »
Onions not doing to badly this year in a new part of the plot. I rarely water album of any type - garlic not at all, I planted October last year. My daughter claims nearly all my garlic (when I have any to harvest),as we don't eat it - makes me quite ill, but she did not care for the flavour of the elephant I grew  last season.

Things not looking too bad on our plot. May even have some red onions to show for my efforts. Now, if I can just get my husband to learn what is a courgette to pick and what is a harlequin squash  to let be a while..... :happy7:
I expect to pass through this world but once; any good thing therefore that I can do, or any kindness that I can show to any fellow creature, let me do it now; let me not defer or neglect it, for I shall not pass this way again.

Beersmith

  • Hectare
  • *****
  • Posts: 668
  • Duston, Northampton. Loam / sand.
Re: Garlic
« Reply #9 on: July 25, 2021, 00:26:43 »
Today I lifted most of my main crop onions before the predicted rain arrived.

Although there was still plenty of green top on most of them the roots were weak. They lifted with only a very gentle tug.  The bases were sound and dry.  Not a single one showed any decay or mould at the base.

I'm getting more and more convinced that TeeGee has the correct idea and that at this time of year leaving them to sit in warm wet soil is the wrong approach.  It is easy to think they could fatten a bit more, but with the roots so fragile I doubt they could be drawing up much moisture or nutrition.
Not mad, just out to mulch!