Author Topic: A Question About Peas  (Read 280 times)

ThomsonAS

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A Question About Peas
« on: May 21, 2020, 19:02:06 »
I grow a line or two of peas most years - with variable results and I've always followed the advice to sow them in "flat bottomed drills". This year, I wondered just WHY. And a quick internet search hasn't given me an answer (perhaps I just used the wrong search terms) but I'd welcome either folks' received wisdom or scientific evidence that this is any better than sowing in close V-shaped drills.

Thanks

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A Question About Peas
« on: May 21, 2020, 19:02:06 »

ancellsfarmer

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Re: A Question About Peas
« Reply #1 on: May 21, 2020, 19:46:19 »
Well, its the way my father did it!
 Guess its to stop them all rolling away. Cannot sow peas (or beans) directly because of voles and field mice. Use  flat bottomed gutter lengths which when planted at 50mm centres give approx 60 seeds per metre across a 100mm width. Using birch or hazel pea boughs along the outside gives a nice table hedge to draw the peas out in to fresh air.
Freelance cultivator qualified within the University of Life.

Tee Gee

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Re: A Question About Peas
« Reply #2 on: May 21, 2020, 20:09:12 »
Quote
I'd welcome either folks' received wisdom or scientific evidence that this is any better than sowing in close V-shaped drills.

Well as I see it each pea seed potentially produces a plant and most plants require a bit of space to grow in!

That said;spreading them out thinly in a flat-bottomed trench  tends to create this space whereas with a "V" trench you would have to space the seeds out individually along the trench to give the spacing, which can be a rather laborious.

Add to that with the flat trench you effectively have a number of rows creating a situation where the plants tend to support each other, whereas the "V" trench method will only give you a single row.

Personally I do a combination of the two by producing " plug plants" as seen here;

http://www.thegardenersalmanac.co.uk/Content/P/Peas/Peas.htm

So to sum up I don't think any one of these methods is better than the other.

Pros & Cons;

Flat trench: Potentially uses most seeds!

V trench: will usually uses fewer seeds subject to the length of the row!

Plug plants: In terms of seed usage somewhere in-between both of the above.

The reason I use the plug plant method is I can get off to an early start, less chance of vermin eating the seeds and I find I get better continuity in so far as I set up a second row of seeds when I plant out the first row, and depending upon the weather I have been known to sow another batch to be ready for replacing the first batch after harvesting!

So in conclusion: Not very scientific but effective!








saddad

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Re: A Question About Peas
« Reply #3 on: May 22, 2020, 11:32:32 »
Again to avoid mice we sow earlier rows in 3" pots.. about ten in each and space out along the line when large enough. Later sowings go in direct in a "V"-shaped drill. Don't rate either method as preferable.

Paulh

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Re: A Question About Peas
« Reply #4 on: May 22, 2020, 12:20:09 »
I guess it's a question of what works for each of us but the general principle is to look after the seeds and get them in lines - mind your peas and queues.