Author Topic: Getting some practice in!  (Read 682 times)

Tee Gee

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Getting some practice in!
« on: March 27, 2020, 14:30:22 »
I don't think I have had my camera out since Harrogate show in September so with the suggestion to have a "Lockdown" competition I thought I would get some practice in!

This is a few I took in the garden after lunchtime today  (I have saved a couple for the competition)

Allotments 4 All

Getting some practice in!
« on: March 27, 2020, 14:30:22 »

Obelixx

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Re: Getting some practice in!
« Reply #1 on: March 27, 2020, 19:50:22 »
May I ask why your garlic is in that tray/crate?  Will it stay there or go out in the ground?
Obxx - Vendée France

daveyboi

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Re: Getting some practice in!
« Reply #2 on: March 27, 2020, 19:55:24 »
An interesting set of photos
And not a weed in sight :)
Daveyboi
Near Haywards Heath Southern U.K.

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galina

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Re: Getting some practice in!
« Reply #3 on: March 27, 2020, 20:33:43 »
Love those big primula.  All very neat and inspiring  :wave:

Tee Gee

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Re: Getting some practice in!
« Reply #4 on: March 27, 2020, 23:33:55 »
May I ask why your garlic is in that tray/crate?  Will it stay there or go out in the ground?

Quite simple!

 Now that I have given up my allotments  I am  trying many ways to produce some edible crops without losing my ornamental garden, and this is one of my ideas.

In other words I am tying to make my garden more edible without it looking like a vegetable garden!

I tried it last year for garlic,onions and leeks with promising results, the Onions grew very well ,the Leeks were a bit thinner than I would have liked and the Garlic was poor.

I grew excellent Carrots and salad crops in my vacant cold-frames and I also grew a dozen Brussels Sprouts

I am on a big learning curve and I am really enjoying the challenge.

I looked at my results at the end of the season and decided on a few changes e.g. My Garlic last year was from saved cloves whereas this year I bought new cloves and hopefully these will give me more success!

For crop rotation purposes I am swapping my onion/ salad crops around!

For the same reason I am going to grow  Carrots in buckets sunk into my herbaceous beds so that the carrot tops will be decorative. I will also grow some Beetroot again to add colour to the border.

So as I said I am on a learning curve and will be trying things as they come to mind!

Then of course I am growing Apples, Pears, Plums and Gooseberries in my herbaceous border and as always. I will be growing Tomatoes, Peppers,  climbing French beans and Cucumbers in my 8 x6 greenhouse

The big problem at the moment is coping with this very unseasonal weather.

In the past I struggled to get light to my plants to stop them getting leggy at this time of the year, now. I am getting too much and my plants are struggling and I am having to mist them at least a couple of times a day.

I hope that answers your question!


Obelixx

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Re: Getting some practice in!
« Reply #5 on: March 28, 2020, 08:15:35 »
Yes thanks Tee Gee.

Do you remember Geoff Hamilton's Ornamental Kitchen Garden series?  He mixed little groups of veggies, just a square foot or so at a time, in with his flowering plants and found he got good crops and fewer pests.   Every time he harvested he bunged on some garden compost before re-planting and got very good yields.

I hope your garlic does well for you.  I don't mind thin leeks if they taste good. 
« Last Edit: March 28, 2020, 08:19:44 by Obelixx »
Obxx - Vendée France