Author Topic: Passata question  (Read 174 times)

pumpkinlover

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Passata question
« on: November 05, 2018, 14:16:48 »
When we make passata or any tomato dish there is always a slightly acid sharpness to the result.
Although we like tomatoes with a bit of bite by the time they have been made into soup or what ever they can be a bit too sharp. I sometimes add a bit of sugar which softens the taste but don't want sweet tomato soup.

I expect that processed food has chemicals added or sweeteners to make it less acid.

Does anyone have any suggestions except moving to sunnier climes where the  fruits ripen and produce more sweetness??



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Passata question
« on: November 05, 2018, 14:16:48 »

galina

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Re: Passata question
« Reply #1 on: November 05, 2018, 15:01:28 »
I am sure what commercial firms add is just that - sugar!  Heinz spaghetti hoops is notorious for its sugar content - nearly 4g per 100g! 
https://www.sainsburys.co.uk/shop/gb/groceries/heinz-spaghetti-hoops-in-tomato-sauce-400g

Adding salt gives the flavour a different direction, but that is as bad if too much.  Have not tried Stevia leaves, but that is an obvious one.  Neither have I tried Sweet Cicely which is supposed to make rhubarb sweeter but adds a slight aniseedy flavour.  Chili is another direction for flavour and onions and garlic too.

Roasting usually sweetens things.  Somebody on here, it might have been Jayb, roasts tomatoes to concentrate the flavour.  That might be another direction to explore.

I wonder whether our resident chef Gazza has a secret.   :wave: 



hippydave

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Re: Passata question
« Reply #2 on: November 05, 2018, 16:59:00 »
I always roast my toms beofre making into sauce with makes them sweeter but I never cook them when making passata and put the toms through a mouli. if the toms are sweet the passata should be sweet unless you are wizzing it with the seeds and this can give it a bitter taint.
you may be a king or a little street sweeper but sooner or later you dance with de reaper.

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Re: Passata question
« Reply #3 on: November 05, 2018, 17:37:39 »
Yes, once it has passed through the sieve/mouli/passata m/c the flavour changes completely, in fact I usually find it needs more salt than I think it should to counterbalance the sweetness.

I also find if I use proper 'paste' toms the result is less acid, some of the cherry toms make quite a sharp sauce, especially if you leave the many seeds in.

pumpkinlover

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Re: Passata question
« Reply #4 on: November 05, 2018, 18:46:58 »
Thanks for the replies.
Will try the roasting technique,    I had thought of it but wasn't sure if they would still go through the passata machine.






BarriedaleNick

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Re: Passata question
« Reply #5 on: November 05, 2018, 18:54:18 »
I always roast mine - let them get a little caramelised and then run them through the sieve.  I made some tonight - making fresh passata from outdoor home grown toms in November - what an odd year!