collapse collapse

* User Info

 
 
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

* Who's Online

  • Dot Guests: 180
  • Dot Spiders: 4
  • Dot Hidden: 0
  • Dot Users: 0
  • Dot Users Online:
  • user Google (AdSense) (2)
  • user Google (2)
  • Dot users are in chat:: 0

* Search


* Recent Topics

topic The weather TODAY in... (Part 2)
[News]
tricia
Yesterday at 10:15:51
topic Celeriac
[Edible Plants]
saddad
February 22, 2021, 19:24:51
topic Shed lighting
[The Basics]
Vinlander
February 22, 2021, 14:46:03
topic Seeds from UK to Ireland and Europe
[News]
Obelixx
February 22, 2021, 09:52:40
topic Sunflowers
[The Basics]
saddad
February 22, 2021, 07:52:00
martinrowe
February 20, 2021, 19:34:06 by martinrowe
Views: 362 | Comments: 2

What do people use to support tall sunflowers?
martinrowe
February 20, 2021, 19:33:02 by martinrowe
Views: 378 | Comments: 5

I have two outbuildings at the top of the garden which I use as sheds.  The Windows are North facing and a bit dark inside.

Can anyone recommend lighting that might be suitable than does not require mains power, as the outbuildings are too far from the property.
February 16, 2021, 18:35:30 by gray1720 | Views: 543 | Comments: 8

Yes, plant singular!

In the ongoing absence of time, money and space to put in the big rockery* with raised pond that I really want to do, I've decided to add a little bit of water to at least attract interests and have added a pair of sink-bowl ponds - hence plant singular!

Any ideas what I could put in them to help attract the critters? See pic - I think they'll look OK once they've been grown up around.

*I have, however, collected from the local fields on my lockdown exercise time not spent on the plot several tons of rocks, many flattish and just nice for building.
Vinlander
February 16, 2021, 14:23:04 by Vinlander
Views: 530 | Comments: 2

I'm posting in Basics because finding flavour is pretty basic.

I'm always on the lookout for well-flavoured varieties in the shops - normally because the seed- and nursery-companies print so much drivel in their adverts that it's the only way to find any at all.

Normally I'm interested in getting at the seeds (piccolo & green tiger tomatoes, orange snack/chiquina peppers etc.)

In this case I'm talking about grapes - there are already several near-black varieties that can be found in our shops at different times of year - they're mostly hybrids crossed with wild species from the Americas. The best ones have a flavour intensity more like cherries - that's apart from some hints of cherry too - Sable is the most famous one - though other similar crosses are sold under the same name. Well worth a try. You may have tasted Flame grapes which are very good but not that intense or 'different'.

All the above are seedless grapes, but you can (very rarely) find a seed in one. I certainly don't recommend you try to grow an immature seed (it needs high-tech really) - you can buy a grape vine called Glenora that ticks the same boxes if (like me) you have to have one in your garden.

However I've discovered a more unusual flavour this week - it is a grape that tastes of lychee. It isn't as strong as lychee but is good enough to be addictive. The grape is sold at a light pink, but the lychee flavour is stronger in the few fruits that are darker.

It's name is Ralli - my batch came from South Africa via a supermarket that shares its name with an island in the N. Atlantic.

My taste buds are hoping it catches on so it's worth my while to encourage you to buy it whenever you see it, because I want to see it in every supermarket soon.

I'll also be looking very carefully for some decent seeds in them!

NB. OTOH the only things that put me off buying lychees are the huge seeds bigger than bullets - a good flavour in not much flesh is still not much flavour per kilo...

Incidentally the other fruit that has a good lychee flavour is the yellow pitaya - not to be confused with the yellow dragonfruit (which is much blander and much easier to grow). It's similar-looking but slimmer - same length but only 50-70% as wide, with smaller, more delicate "scales". It's more expensive, even per fruit - I've only ever found them in posh food halls like Selfridges and Harrods, though they are available from specialist fruiterers in the Canary Islands.
 
Cheers.

Amazon

* Allotment Gallery

Root trainer
Allotment Gallery
Views: 2655
By: Barnowl

* Allotment Wiki

* Calendar

February 2021
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
1 2 3 4 5 6
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 [25] 26 27
28

* Top Boards

anything