Author Topic: Butternut squash  (Read 330 times)

AnnieD

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Butternut squash
« on: October 15, 2018, 08:28:48 »
Someone on our allotments was giving plants away so I had one. It produced one fruit.

I want to make something interesting with it, any ideas please?
Located in Royston, North Herts.

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Butternut squash
« on: October 15, 2018, 08:28:48 »

small

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Re: Butternut squash
« Reply #1 on: October 15, 2018, 08:36:45 »
It makes  a wonderful soup, but with only one,  hmmm. You won't get the texture delight of ir roasted in slices in olive oil with just a sprinkle of thyme....or lightly fried slices, with some onion, to go with sausages....obviously you can add chunks to casseroles, but it's a bit precious to mingle the flavours....
I had 15 from just 2 plants this year as opposed to my usual one per plant, can you see I'm trying to find lots of ways to use them!

Yorkshire Lass

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Re: Butternut squash
« Reply #2 on: October 15, 2018, 08:54:56 »
Try this,  we enjoy it.

Butternut Squash Gratin

Cut squash into chunks and roast in the oven on a tray.
Cook a small savoy cabbage and two leeks in a large pan for 3 mins then drain.
Cook 2oz of penne pasta and drain.
Make one pint of cheese sauce.

Now assemle - grease  a large ovenproof dish with butter,. place in the dish the cabbage, leeks, pasta putting the squash pieces on top. Then smother with the cheese sauce and bake in the oven for approx 25 mins on 180.

Vinlander

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Re: Butternut squash
« Reply #3 on: October 15, 2018, 09:18:41 »
From how you got it, the late variety and how little it's produced - it's possible it isn't properly ripened anyway - if so it will be too tender for recipes expecting a dense dry flesh.

If the flesh is more like courgette then treat it as one.

I use unripe squash to make fritters in batter - in fact I begrudge the ones that get to more than half their full size because that nutty overtone goes at some point.

With anything half-ripened, time is of the essence - I'd grate the rest of it raw to make a 50/50 coleslaw with chopped cabbage. If grating releases too much water chop in batons (this is even more essential if you use chinese cabbage - never grate it - but the batons make a really light coleslaw).

Cheers.

With a microholding you always get too much or bugger-all. (I'm fed up calling it an allotment garden - it just encourages the tidy-police).

The simple/complex split is more & more important: Simple fertilisers Poor, complex ones Good. Simple (old) poisons predictable, others (new) the opposite.

tricia

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Re: Butternut squash
« Reply #4 on: October 15, 2018, 10:21:24 »
If it is butternut coloured I would let it mature on a window will for a few weeks to improve the flavour before trying one of the suggested recipes, if it's still green or pale yellow it won't keep long!

Tricia :wave:

AnnieD

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Re: Butternut squash
« Reply #5 on: October 18, 2018, 14:41:05 »
Hi yes it is butternut coloured - ame as the ones in Tesco. I picked it last week and it's sitting on a windowsill in the sunshine.

The gratin sounds yummy.
Located in Royston, North Herts.

AnnieD

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Re: Butternut squash
« Reply #6 on: November 04, 2018, 18:26:50 »
I just made a a sausage and squash risotto with half of my squash. It was very yummy.
Located in Royston, North Herts.