Author Topic: Wallnut Tree  (Read 821 times)

cambourne7

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Wallnut Tree
« on: June 15, 2019, 20:45:02 »
Hi All,

A friend has offered me a Wallnut tree seedling which has popped up under a productive tree in his garden. I have said yes but my plan was to stick this into a very large pot behind the 3 apple trees and i am now worried it will be a little to shady for it there so i am going to find somewhere else to put the pot. I am going to use the spent potato compost after this year into the pot (3ft wide) anything else that you guys can think off before i start clearing space and getting the pot ready.

Thanks Cam

Allotments 4 All

Wallnut Tree
« on: June 15, 2019, 20:45:02 »

ACE

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Re: Wallnut Tree
« Reply #1 on: June 16, 2019, 05:42:05 »
Old wife's tale or not, the old boys used to swear that a walnut tree near apples will stop the apples fruiting.

Paulh

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Re: Wallnut Tree
« Reply #2 on: June 16, 2019, 07:41:20 »
Walnuts grow to 80 feet, so you'll need a large pot!

Apparently the roots and decaying leaves release a chemical into the soil which is poisonous to some other plants, including apples.

galina

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Re: Wallnut Tree
« Reply #3 on: June 16, 2019, 08:33:24 »
I was also thinking that shade is not your problem, but size of the tree.  Do you have a front garden where it could go?  It will outgrow any pot in next to no time.  And then what, having spent a year of tlc on it.  I think the decision keep or not should be made now, and if keep then a proper space must be planned for it.

It will be at least 4 years from seed to your first nuts.


  :sunny:

ACE

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Re: Wallnut Tree
« Reply #4 on: June 16, 2019, 08:34:10 »
No need to go and get yourself sprayed orange if it ever fruits  :toothy10: When we were nippers an old soldier told us that they used the outer husks of walnuts to rub on their skin to blend in with the natives in the jungle. Of cause we had to try it and no amount of carbolic and scrubbing would shift it. I still had a 'suntan' at xmas. And don't forget to give it a good thrashing now and again.


𝘈 𝘋𝘖𝘎, 𝘈 𝘞𝘐𝘍𝘌 𝘈𝘕𝘋 𝘈 𝘞𝘈𝘓𝘕𝘜𝘛 𝘛𝘙𝘌𝘌,
𝘛𝘏𝘌 𝘔𝘖𝘙𝘌 𝘠𝘖𝘜 𝘉𝘌𝘈𝘛 𝘐𝘛
𝘛𝘏𝘌 𝘉𝘌𝘛𝘛𝘌𝘙 𝘐𝘛'𝘓𝘓 𝘉𝘌
« Last Edit: June 16, 2019, 08:39:32 by ACE »

Obelixx

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Re: Wallnut Tree
« Reply #5 on: June 16, 2019, 09:54:05 »
They like full sun and space and yes, they do release chemicals into the soil which prevent competition from growing but that won't be a problem in a pot.

They don't like the cold and take forever to come into leaf.  There was a newish plantation of a 100 or more near our Belgian house which started in late May/early June in a cold spring.   Even here, the ones in our garden (youngest is 30) waited till mid May this year.   They do take years to start fruiting.

Obxx - Vendée France

saddad

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Re: Wallnut Tree
« Reply #6 on: June 18, 2019, 22:22:47 »
I pulled what I thought was a self set sycamore from one of my tubs earlier this year to find what was very clearly a walnut that had sprouted. How it got there (squirrels) is anyone's guess... there are no fruiting Walnuts on the allotments as far as I know. It has recovered from the manhandling into a deep pot... but have no idea what to do next..

Paulh

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Re: Wallnut Tree
« Reply #7 on: June 21, 2019, 07:41:34 »
I pulled what I thought was a self set sycamore from one of my tubs earlier this year to find what was very clearly a walnut that had sprouted. How it got there (squirrels) is anyone's guess... there are no fruiting Walnuts on the allotments as far as I know. It has recovered from the manhandling into a deep pot... but have no idea what to do next..

Your choice is either:

- the compost heap, or
- plant it where it will become someone else's problem in ten years time.

saddad

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Re: Wallnut Tree
« Reply #8 on: June 22, 2019, 19:56:22 »
I like that advice, if DebP isn't looking I might sneak it into our allotments "wildlife area"...  :wave:

Russell

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Re: Wallnut Tree
« Reply #9 on: June 24, 2019, 11:28:27 »
I understand that all walnut trees produce very good and expensive timber (in time!) but the best fruiting strains are propagated by grafting. Historically owners of large estates were known to plant a row or two  of walnut trees to increase the value of the estate for their grandchildren.

cambourne7

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Re: Wallnut Tree
« Reply #10 on: June 24, 2019, 12:25:37 »
I understand that all walnut trees produce very good and expensive timber (in time!) but the best fruiting strains are propagated by grafting. Historically owners of large estates were known to plant a row or two  of walnut trees to increase the value of the estate for their grandchildren.

The person selling these is moving to a farm and has some for his own land :)

Vinlander

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Re: Wallnut Tree
« Reply #11 on: June 25, 2019, 09:09:37 »
I saw a ~ 6' tall potted walnut plant at Chelsea 15 years ago (maybe more)  that had fruit on it - supposed to be the fastest type - came from somewhere in the eastern bloc.

It might have been a selection of the Carpathian type https://www.arborday.org/trees/treeguide/TreeDetail.cfm?ItemID=935 .

If grafted it might have been just 2 or 3 years old (grafted plants pick up a lot of maturity from the scion - so do cuttings to some extent).

More useful info including its 'chemical warfare' in here https://www.connonnurseries.com/plant/Juglans-regia-Carpathian .

No sign of grafted Carpathian trees on sale - odd - maybe another Google glitch, or flooding by sites who pay?

Cheers.

PS. some people say the "beat a walnut tree" thing is to damage the grain - a complex grain in walnut veneer is much sought after.

With a microholding you always get too much or bugger-all. (I'm fed up calling it an allotment garden - it just encourages the tidy-police).

The simple/complex split is more & more important: Simple fertilisers Poor, complex ones Good. Simple (old) poisons predictable, others (new) the opposite.

jennym

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Re: Wallnut Tree
« Reply #12 on: June 29, 2019, 01:32:18 »
The saying  "..... and a walnut tree,  the more you beat them, the better they be", I thought that beating a walnut tree referred to using a long stick to whack the ends of the branches to help the nuts come down, and when you did this, some of the damage to the tips helped more fruiting spurs on the tips develop for next year.
But I read somewhere later that some walnuts produce mainly on tips and some on spurs along branches (like different apples do). I only ever came across tip bearing walnuts, so the saying made sense to me.