Author Topic: help  (Read 463 times)

brownthumb2

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help
« on: May 22, 2018, 07:18:11 »
My partner sprayed weed killer on the only patch of ground I've got left to plant my sweet corn on He thinks by going no dig means weed kill so how long must I wait until safe to plant I've 60 odd plants needing to go in  ? last autumn he sprayed with out my knowledge one of my raspberry  beds he thought as they had no leaves it would be safe  to spray the bind weed I've loads of bind weed still     but no Raspberries   

Allotments 4 All

help
« on: May 22, 2018, 07:18:11 »

rowbow

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Re: help
« Reply #1 on: May 22, 2018, 07:38:23 »
It should tell you on the packet how long before you can plant?  :sunny:
Spring has arrived I am so excited I have wet my PLANTS

Obelixx

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Re: help
« Reply #2 on: May 22, 2018, 07:48:00 »
Depends on the kind of weedkiller used - leaf contact such as glyphosate which, in theory, goes inert on contact with the soil, or total annihalation of weeds and a seed germination preventer too that stays active longer.

 Can I suggest you remove any remaining weed killer products? 
Obxx - Vendée France

brownthumb2

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Re: help
« Reply #3 on: May 22, 2018, 08:15:08 »
What he used was  rosella or similar sounding name  in a container requiring  dilution but the labels worn away and leaflet lost but its a systematic one kills  the roots it suppose to dissolve on contact with the soil The weed killer is only for use on the outside of the fence to stop weeds  from growing in from the no mans land which borders my allotment

Obelixx

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Re: help
« Reply #4 on: May 22, 2018, 11:50:37 »
Have you tried googling for info on its use?
Obxx - Vendée France

johhnyco15

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Re: help
« Reply #5 on: May 22, 2018, 12:20:27 »
id plant a row and wait  a week then if ok plant the rest if its resolva it shoiuld be fine to plant hope this helps
johhnyc015  may the plot be with you

ancellsfarmer

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Re: help
« Reply #6 on: May 22, 2018, 12:25:32 »
In the absence of the fullest details, it is best I do not give you the advice that springs first to mind! On a more positive note,
has ANY vegetation regrown on that area?
does it appear vigorous and healthy?
In the case of doubt- dont.
Maybe you have an area due for courgettes/squash/cucumbers , all of which should allow you to plant and establish sweetcorn before planting the curcubits around. Kind of two sisters....

A garden shared is a garden halved.
Freelance cultivator qualified within the University of Life.

squeezyjohn

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Re: help
« Reply #7 on: May 22, 2018, 13:19:56 »
As has been said ... you need to check which kind of weedkiller was used to know the answer to the question.

As an aside, I don't buy this claim that glyphosate becomes inert on contact with soil.  My allotment neighbour regularly sprays roundup on his side of our boundary fence.  As far as I can tell he's pretty careful only to spray his side - often when I can see his side become brown - little weed seedlings on my side carry on growing fine ... however any nearby perennials on my side suffer the effects of weedkiller - presumably because they have a bigger root network that goes under the fence - I have lost globe artichokes, asparagus plants, lovage, thyme and oregano planted near the fence (but up to 2 foot away from it) ... While glyphosate may break down in the soil eventually ... it is by no means instant!

Tee Gee

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Re: help
« Reply #8 on: May 22, 2018, 13:21:38 »
I did a google for you and came up with a product called: Rosate Glyphosate TF

see here: https://www.pitchcare.com/shop/professional-weed-killers-all-alphabetical/index.html

If this this is the brand it is glyphosate based herbicide so it should not have contaminated the soil.

Personally I would re-dig the area and remove any plant life / root as I proceed as it is possible this will be contaminated ( as planned) but not the soil around it asuuming the product used was glyphosate based.

You could throw a few sacrificial seed of something that germinates quickly  and see how they perform and take it from there!

Hope this helps!



brownthumb2

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Re: help
« Reply #9 on: May 22, 2018, 15:19:58 »
 yes rosate  sounds like the one we got  will leave it a little longer its been two weeks last Saturday so will plant them on the week end and hope for the best Smashing info and advise I've had of every one Thank you all

hippydave

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Re: help
« Reply #10 on: May 22, 2018, 16:04:46 »
You can in fact plant as soon as the spray has dried as it has no residual affect and is broken down in the soil quite quickly.
you may be a king or a little street sweeper but sooner or later you dance with de reaper.

cambourne7

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Re: help
« Reply #11 on: May 23, 2018, 10:09:51 »
While i am sure the danger has gone you could dig a trench and backfill with clean soil and plant into that.

Obelixx

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Re: help
« Reply #12 on: May 23, 2018, 12:50:51 »
Squeezy - your perennials will be affected by fine spray drifting over.  Glyphosate works thru the leaves and is passed down to the roots.  Doesn't work on none green tissue.  Next time you see your neighbour spraying ask him to make sure the wind is not blowing in your direction or else get out there straightaway and rinse all your foliage before the glyphosate has time to be absorbed.

As far as re-planting goes, yes it is "inert" on contact with soil and won't kill new plantings but it has been shown that it does leach down thru soils and into waterways where it is having and adverse effect on some waterways.  It has also been linked to higher concentrations of cancer and birth defects in areas that use a lot so France has banned it completely.  I haven't yet explored the alternatives and we're trying to tackle pernicious weeds by barrier methods and constant vigilance.
Obxx - Vendée France

Vinlander

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Re: help
« Reply #13 on: June 07, 2018, 07:46:08 »
I don't buy this claim that glyphosate becomes inert on contact with soil. 

It goes against the grain to compliment a weedkiller, but I have some reason to think it does become ineffective on contact with soil (but not necessarily safe for us).

I used to use glysophate and once made the mistake of diluting it with water from the dipping tank (which has lots of soil bacteria - especially from people who endlessly and ostentatiously wash the soil off their crop roots).

It did absolutely nothing when I sprayed it on my weeds - but the same stuff made with tap water was very effective. The weather in both cases was 100% dry (effectiveness varies between 0% and 100% in inverse proportion to how much and how soon rain falls after application).

Spray drift however is always 100% targeted at the next plot and 100% fatal (because of Murphy's Law), plus the fact that all weedkillers are 100% effective against all crops despite being 100% useless against many weeds.

I also think the 'cide companies have so many ways to pull the wool over our eyes* without having to say something that is so easy to disprove - even the "Lie Big " method fails on this one...

* I recommend Ben Goldacre's book "Bad Science" as an antidote to this kind of flim-flam and far worse excesses. A summary of the book in my words would be:

"1) It's so easy for 'big chem' and 'big pharm' companies to cloud and manipulate results using highly talented, highly specialised teams of highly mercenary 'scientists' and statisticians.
2) No medical professional (with a proper day job helping people) has the time or expert specialised statistical knowledge to check them out.
3) The only answer is to have a college of equally dedicated and talented people paid to debunk trials".

Think loss adjusters and loss assessors, or prosecution and defence (probably the other way around).

Cheers.
« Last Edit: June 07, 2018, 08:17:07 by Vinlander »
With a microholding you always get too much or bugger-all. (I'm fed up calling it an allotment garden - it just encourages the tidy-police).

The simple/complex split is more & more important: Simple fertilisers Poor, complex ones Good. Simple (old) poisons predictable, others (new) the opposite.

brownthumb2

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Re: re help /sweetcorn
« Reply #14 on: June 11, 2018, 11:24:25 »
 I planted my sweet corn two weeks after the weed killer was used  they were a little root bound as they should have gone in earlier and took a little while to get  going but growing good  I  don't think  I would have fancied planting root crops  in the same area but thought it ok to plant sweet corn