Author Topic: Raspberries in Asparagus bed.  (Read 360 times)

bluecar

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Raspberries in Asparagus bed.
« on: October 16, 2017, 17:21:07 »
Hello all.

Some raspberry canes from my neighbours plot have migrated over to my asparagus bed. How can I get rid of them? I don't want to dig the crowns out as I'll damage them.

Regards

Bluecar

Beersmith

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Re: Raspberries in Asparagus bed.
« Reply #1 on: October 16, 2017, 21:40:20 »
Very very difficult.

I have a similar problem where a neighbours canes are running into my strawberry bed. But the strawberry bed is two years old so I will tolerate it for another year before forking the whole area. I'd be moving the bed anyway.  Asparagus beds are probably best left for many years so that is not really an option.

Any physical attempt to fork out the Raspberries is likely to seriously damage your asparagus. But if you try a chemical attack, say by using say roundup gel on the emerging shoots you may well end up killing the canes on your neighbours plot. That is hardly likely to keep you on good terms with the next plot holder.

I'd suggest digging a narrow and very deep trench between your asparagus bed and your neighbours canes to sever all the roots running between the two. Once you have done this then get to work (carefully) with a glyphosate gel. I don't normally resort to chemicals like this, but I cannot see any other solution in this case.

Not mad, just out to mulch!

Obelixx

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Re: Raspberries in Asparagus bed.
« Reply #2 on: October 16, 2017, 22:01:30 »
In my last garden, early on, we planted yellow autumn raspberries in a bed next to the ornamental garden and they spread into my perennials and shrubs.  We dug out the original plants and saved some for moving into a new fruit area and I found the ones which had strayed could be pulled up - with a bit of effort.   Much easier after a good rainfall and no digging or spraying in amongst treasures I didn't want to endanger.

If you can sever the roots as described above and spray any coming up on the path or boundary between you and your neighbour you should be able to take out the strays without harming your asparagus roots.
Obxx - Vendée France

johhnyco15

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Re: Raspberries in Asparagus bed.
« Reply #3 on: October 17, 2017, 15:20:41 »
im afraid you just have to keep on pulling them up slide your hand down as far as you can and with a sharp pull they should come up
johhnyc015  may the plot be with you

bluecar

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Re: Raspberries in Asparagus bed.
« Reply #4 on: October 17, 2017, 19:18:41 »
Okay.

Thanks folks. I'll try pulling them out - if that doesn't work I'll have to try colorfast gel.

squeezyjohn

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Re: Raspberries in Asparagus bed.
« Reply #5 on: October 17, 2017, 20:19:56 »
Been there, done that!  Only in my case I was the culprit who planted the raspberries to close ... it's amazing how far their roots will run looking for new territory ... The trick is not to let them get a foothold in the asparagus bed.  You have to do as is said above and remove as much of the offending root as you can furtle for in the soil.  After that it's a case of being very diligent and not letting any top growth of the raspberries remain ... a bit like trying to hoe a perennial weed to death by slowly weakening it.  Eventually that bit of the root will weaken ... but it will probably not stop trying to come up on your nicely tended bit of soil.

brownthumb2

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Re: Raspberries in Asparagus bed.
« Reply #6 on: October 28, 2017, 08:42:13 »
 Kidnapping this thread   How deep must the trench  be dug,? to stop the spread of  raspberry roots taking over the allotment

squeezyjohn

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Re: Raspberries in Asparagus bed.
« Reply #7 on: October 28, 2017, 10:46:07 »
Kidnapping this thread   How deep must the trench  be dug,? to stop the spread of  raspberry roots taking over the allotment

In my experience ... until you hit bedrock!

Vinlander

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Re: Raspberries in Asparagus bed.
« Reply #8 on: October 30, 2017, 09:33:34 »
If you fill the trench with woodchip it makes it much easier to dig out next time - in fact if you push the spade in along the raspberry side regularly it should chop off any exploring rhizomes, and if these sprout up a child could pull them out.

But you need to replace the woodchip every 12 months max. to keep it light enough - not to mention the fact that it needs topping up regularly as it rots and settles.

My next asparagus bed will have this kind of cordon sanitaire on all 4 sides - in my case to stop the couch coming in from the paths - plus bindweed form one side where it is tolerated.

A lot of plotholders tolerate it - it's the beam in their eye - doesn't stop them complaining about harmless annual weeds like dandelions - as if anything will stop dandelions - you only need one to a parish and then it's a lost cause - they even complain about feral crops like land cress and salsify.

Some people...

Cheers.
With a microholding you always get too much or bugger-all. (I'm fed up calling it an allotment garden - it just encourages the tidy-police).

The simple/complex split is more & more important: Simple fertilisers Poor, complex ones Good. Simple (old) poisons predictable, others (new) the opposite.

Allotments 4 All

Re: Raspberries in Asparagus bed.
« Reply #8 on: October 30, 2017, 09:33:34 »

 

anything