Author Topic: Storms, greenhouses and seeds  (Read 1111 times)

Borderers1951

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Storms, greenhouses and seeds
« on: February 18, 2022, 14:55:40 »
Well, so far the storms have flattened one of my aluminium-framed greenhouses and I fully expect the other to go the same way in the next few hours.  When it comes to replacements I am considering timber with some extra bracing and a wind-brake.  Anyone got any  thoughts on timber versus the various metal frames?  Changing the subject, is anyone having problems with non-germinating seeds?  My wife bought two packs of Sweet Pea seeds, none of which have germinated.  I am finding that some vegetable seeds are just as bad, as are several neighbours on the allotments.  We buy mail-order, from garden centres and on Ebay.  Those from garden centres and from reputable online sellers germinate reasonably well in most, but not all cases. Those from Ebay traders are uniformly bad.  I don't want to tar everyone with the same brush but there seem to be some cowboys out there making money from selling out-of-date seeds.  Beware!

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Storms, greenhouses and seeds
« on: February 18, 2022, 14:55:40 »
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  • Tee Gee

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    Re: Storms, greenhouses and seeds
    « Reply #1 on: February 18, 2022, 16:15:12 »
    Quote
    Anyone got any  thoughts on timber versus the various metal frames?
     

    Over the years I have found the timber version of Alton Dutch style greenhouses best.(pic1)

    I had an aluminium version on the allotment, but I found that in high winds it tended to rattle a bit and on occasions crack the glass, whereas my timber version had full length glazing beads which held the glass more firmly (pic 2)

    I brought my 8x 6 Aluminium greenhouse and placed it in my back garden when I gave up my allotments.
    Like my Alton Alloy greenhouse it rattles a bit and glass sometimes slips down because the wire spring clips are not as robust as full length glazing beads. (pic3)

    Tee Gee

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    Re: Storms, greenhouses and seeds
    « Reply #2 on: February 18, 2022, 16:27:40 »
    Quote
    Sweet Pea seeds, none of which have germinated

    You don't say how you set them off, my preferred method is chitting them on the top of the compost rather than covering them with compost as seen here (along with other methods I have used over the years!)

    https://www.thegardenersalmanac.co.uk/Content/L/Lathyrus/Lathyrus.htm

    Quote
    I am finding that some vegetable seeds are just as bad

    I have a gut feeling (no proof) but I think global warming has something to do with it as flower and seed initiation is being affected by the crazy mixed up seasons that are affecting the pollinators.

    Beersmith

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    Re: Storms, greenhouses and seeds
    « Reply #3 on: February 19, 2022, 14:50:02 »
    Tee Gee

    It is well known that some seeds require stratification.  Perennial sweet peas for one.  I wonder if for the annual varieties it might not be absolutely necessary but might be helpful to some degree.  Have you ever experimented or tried it?
    Not mad, just out to mulch!

    Tee Gee

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    Re: Storms, greenhouses and seeds
    « Reply #4 on: February 19, 2022, 15:49:07 »
    Quote
    It is well known that some seeds require stratification.  Perennial sweet peas for one.  I wonder if for the annual varieties it might not be absolutely necessary, but might be helpful to some degree.  Have you ever experimented or tried it?

    I have never grown perennial sweet peas and this year, for the first time or should I say last year, I sowed my sweet peas using my favoured chitting method in early September and grew them on as biennials. The pic below is the result as of 4th February.

    (ps As things stand I think I will be going back to spring sowing next year I don't like how 'leggy these plants have become)

    This is the nearest experience I have had to your question and as it happened the temperatures in September were relatively mild as I recall, so they did not undergo particularly cold temperatures like you would get from true COLD stratification. In fact, they had chitted by the 12th Sept when I covered them with compost.

    In terms of stratifying, the 2nd photo are a number of seed varieties I am currently stratifying. The chart is a section of my sowing plan, where the  code C2 or C4 means cold stratification for 2 or 4 weeks and the date in the Off column is the date I move them from the cold into warmer conditions.

    To date; none of my stratified seeds have germinated yet!

    Based on how 'global warming' is affecting our seasons, I am not sure short of placing them in the fridge if we will ever get the full effect of 'coldframe stratification'again!

    On that note; I don't think t'other half would take kindly to me using our fridge for germinating seeds. I know I got a few choice comments when I commandeered the Microwave to sterilise my seed compost. Luck had it for me when the turntable on the microwave stopped turning, and I had an excuse to replace it with a new one, and I got the old one in my greenhouse! As you can see in pic 4


     

    anything