Author Topic: Tayberries  (Read 1273 times)

rutters

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Tayberries
« on: July 25, 2021, 12:08:56 »
Bought a plant from ASDA, put it in a big pot and it's growing really tall.

The growth is in the form of the shoots becoming really long (about 6ft) but as yet no fruits or even buds.
Just wondering if I should could it back to promote new growth or just leave it?

Maybe it's just too early yet anyway? Or maybe I should expect nothing in the first year?

Thanks
Before you criticise someone, you should walk a mile in their shoes.
That way, when you criticise them, you're a mile away and you have their shoes.

Allotments 4 All

Tayberries
« on: July 25, 2021, 12:08:56 »

Paulh

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Re: Tayberries
« Reply #1 on: July 25, 2021, 13:40:27 »
They fruit on the previous year's growth. Your 6' long shoot will develop spurs next year that flower and fruit. After it's fruited, cut that shoot out (on mine it dies back anyway) and tie in the new shoots that have grown during the year.

rutters

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Re: Tayberries
« Reply #2 on: July 25, 2021, 14:09:54 »
Thank you
Before you criticise someone, you should walk a mile in their shoes.
That way, when you criticise them, you're a mile away and you have their shoes.

Tee Gee

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Re: Tayberries
« Reply #3 on: July 25, 2021, 16:27:57 »

IanDH

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Re: Tayberries
« Reply #4 on: July 26, 2021, 11:40:06 »
It took my Tayberry plant a couple of years to get into it's stride as well, so if it does not fruit too heavily next year do not worry too much.  I grow it tied along wires to support.  The wired frame is 3m long. This year managed on to the end, up to a different level and 1/2 way back again, so allow plenty of space.

Birds love the fruit.  Blackbirds seem to take before fully ripe, so you will need to net.  Freeze fairly well.

ACE

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Re: Tayberries
« Reply #5 on: July 27, 2021, 12:40:41 »
I inherited some tayberry/loganberry plants when I took over my present plot. They were in the way so I hooked them up and planted them along the double pallets I use for compost bins. Had a few berries, then after I cut them all back they went mad. I have just cropped them for the last month to eat with my breakfast yoghurt and froze up about 3k. Now I have taken all the old wood off and trained and re-tied the runners along. I expect they get fed with the compost leaching. Nice fruit, I pick them slightly before they are fully ripe and they ripen on the 2 mile ride home.

saddad

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Re: Tayberries
« Reply #6 on: July 27, 2021, 14:16:29 »
My plot neighbour has some and they crop heavily once settled in...

gray1720

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Re: Tayberries
« Reply #7 on: July 27, 2021, 16:39:35 »
Just seconding that they do take their time - mine is in its third year. and we are struggling to find space to eat the gooseberries because the tayberry is so productive!
My garden is smaller than your Rome, but my pilum is harder than your sternum!

saddad

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Re: Tayberries
« Reply #8 on: July 27, 2021, 17:58:56 »
Both freeze well....  :sunny:

Vinlander

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Re: Tayberries
« Reply #9 on: July 27, 2021, 19:41:20 »
They do freeze well, and they take a lot less room if you gently squash the bag first, and (even better) - if you lick the frozen lump you will find it is the best lolly ice you've ever tasted (visiting children agree, and so does my wife - the only exception to a lifetime of answering NO to the questions "do you want to try this?" and "would you like some more of it?").

The biggest bonus is that you don't notice the seeds anything like as much as you would in mashes or fools or Eton messes (I prefer to call the latter unconsidered trifles)

It's even better if you use a more different pair or more complementary pair of fruits eg. Tayberry and Strawberry, or Pear and Blackcurrant, or Plum, Apple and Blackberry.

Cheers.
With a microholding you always get too much or bugger-all. (I'm fed up calling it an allotment garden - it just encourages the tidy-police).

The simple/complex split is more & more important: Simple fertilisers Poor, complex ones Good. Simple (old) poisons predictable, others (new) the opposite.

davholla

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Re: Tayberries
« Reply #10 on: August 05, 2021, 10:34:07 »
I planted these in the front garden in 2006 and they did well for a few years but since then they done really badly.
Any ideas?  Sadly the one in the plot has not done well but maybe it is too close to the blackberries.