Author Topic: Bolting Celeriac  (Read 1495 times)

saddad

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Bolting Celeriac
« on: June 04, 2021, 08:29:01 »
Well, I had heard that the cold April might make it bolt, but had never had it happened before... this hot snap has made almost all of it bolt... a plot neighbour has some seedling I could prick out... any chance they would have time to develop?

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Bolting Celeriac
« on: June 04, 2021, 08:29:01 »

Tee Gee

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Re: Bolting Celeriac
« Reply #1 on: June 04, 2021, 08:55:23 »
Quote
Any chance they would have time to develop?

Why not give them a try if you have space to plant them in.

As I see, it you have nothing to lose, and with a bit of luck potentially a lot to gain!

So best of luck!

Beersmith

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Re: Bolting Celeriac
« Reply #2 on: June 04, 2021, 22:19:55 »
I would not bother. They are very slow growing, so unlikely to produce a worthwhile crop.. Might be better to use the ground for something more productive. Still plenty of time to sow some crops. How about Florence fennel?  Sown late they will often stand well into autumn. Plenty of alternatives.

I don't think the warm weather was the problem.  I think the cold early weather was the trigger.  Once they have had enough cold exposure, they seem to have a mechanism that makes them behave as if they have already been through a full winter. Then it is just natural biennial plant behaviour to run to seed. 
Not mad, just out to mulch!

Beersmith

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Re: Bolting Celeriac
« Reply #3 on: June 04, 2021, 22:34:29 »
I would not bother. They are very slow growing, so unlikely to produce a worthwhile crop.. Might be better to use the ground for something more productive. Still plenty of time to sow some crops. How about Florence fennel?  Sown late they will often stand well into autumn. Plenty of alternatives.

I don't think the warm weather was the problem.  I think the cold early weather was the trigger.  Once they have had enough cold exposure, they seem to have a mechanism that makes them behave as if they have already been through a full winter. Then it is just natural biennial plant behaviour to run to seed.

And I would add. In my humble opinion, bolting cannot be prevented by watering, shade or anything else once that cold trigger has been set.  Good reason to always make your first sowing of beetroot Boltardy even if you sow other varieties later.
Not mad, just out to mulch!

Tiny Clanger

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Re: Bolting Celeriac
« Reply #4 on: June 05, 2021, 13:12:58 »
Yes they have a good chance. Make sure they don't get too dry. A weekly feed may help. Good luck, hope things work out  :blob7:
I expect to pass through this world but once; any good thing therefore that I can do, or any kindness that I can show to any fellow creature, let me do it now; let me not defer or neglect it, for I shall not pass this way again.

saddad

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Re: Bolting Celeriac
« Reply #5 on: June 06, 2021, 10:02:28 »
I'll give the seedlings a go, will only need one of the two "boxes" and can grow something else in the other..

Beersmith

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Re: Bolting Celeriac
« Reply #6 on: June 06, 2021, 10:10:06 »
I'll give the seedlings a go, will only need one of the two "boxes" and can grow something else in the other..

Good call!
Not mad, just out to mulch!

saddad

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Re: Bolting Celeriac
« Reply #7 on: June 06, 2021, 17:37:46 »
Have some white beetroot seedlings looking for a new home. :wave:

Also seem to have asparagus seedlings coming up everywhere... twelve in one tomato bucket, and some of my best asparagus is self set, I know because it is under a Jasminium Nudiflorum arch... I would never have planted any there! I think the birds on the feeder are giving the seeds a good start! Almost all my "Spargle" is Connovers Colossal... and these live up to the name! :toothy10:

tricia

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Re: Bolting Celeriac
« Reply #8 on: June 06, 2021, 22:44:28 »
 I'd love to grow asparagus Saddad, but I think I'm too old to start! I have a 1m x 2m raised bed where I no longer grow celeriac (woodlice always used them as breeding colonies, ugh!) which would probably be big enough for a few crowns to provide me with a taste of one of my favourite seasonal vegetables.

Can one buy mature crowns which would produce a small crop in the year following planting? Or is it just not feasible to even think about growing my own asparagus at the advanced age of 87? Any advice?

Tricia  :wave:

gray1720

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Re: Bolting Celeriac
« Reply #9 on: June 07, 2021, 08:55:08 »
There are certainly varieties that supposedly will crop the year after planting, or even the year of planting if you are lucky (and you are in Devon, where everything starts weeks earlier. Having a windswept plot I've never investigated them so I'm not sure about varieties, but there's a Dutch-looking one that rings a faint bell - Gijnlim, or something like that?

Give it a go - if you're not around to eat it, you'll be past caring anyway!
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saddad

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Re: Bolting Celeriac
« Reply #10 on: June 07, 2021, 09:08:35 »
My allotment neighbour was still cultivating, including digging out her own potatoes until she died aged 95 and 1/2 Tricia so I would say it was definitely worth a try...

 

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