Author Topic: Asparagus newbie  (Read 703 times)

AnnieD

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Asparagus newbie
« on: January 21, 2021, 13:24:33 »
I've cleared out a bed, and want to put in some asparagus crowns.

Please can some experienced growers recommend which variety (ies) to go for, and which suppliers are tried and trusted. So much choice out there, and it's a long term investment so I want to get it right.

Thanks all
Located in Royston, North Herts.

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Asparagus newbie
« on: January 21, 2021, 13:24:33 »

saddad

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Re: Asparagus newbie
« Reply #1 on: January 22, 2021, 07:49:53 »
I've always gone for Convers Colossal, raised from seed, when people have bought me F1 crowns they don't take or live up to the hype.

Vinlander

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Re: Asparagus newbie
« Reply #2 on: January 24, 2021, 14:53:23 »
In many ways open pollinated crowns are less fussy (and cheaper), but one of the issues with them is that you may get a female - which produce more seed and less spears. If you grow from seed you will definitely get females, but even if you don't, some feral seed will arrive and hide in your row.

The usual advice is to dig out anything that shows berries, but it can be really hard to get them out without damaging the crowns around them.

I prefer to mark them with a brightly coloured stick or ring, and cut every single spear they make until they stop producing - so you get a few spears a week when you usually don't get any. Even a big well-established female will give up after 2 or 3 years of relentless cropping.

Win-win!

Cheers.
With a microholding you always get too much or bugger-all. (I'm fed up calling it an allotment garden - it just encourages the tidy-police).

The simple/complex split is more & more important: Simple fertilisers Poor, complex ones Good. Simple (old) poisons predictable, others (new) the opposite.

gwynleg

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Re: Asparagus newbie
« Reply #3 on: January 26, 2021, 08:38:21 »
I brought from Ď A grade asparagusí , on a recommendation and have been delighted with the quality and strength of the plants. Much better than others I had in a previous allotment ( canít remember who I brought them from). I think theyíre imported from Europe though so wonder if Brexit might affect that. Good luck. Iím on my third year so can finally have a good crop this year!

Vinlander

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Re: Asparagus newbie
« Reply #4 on: January 27, 2021, 11:50:21 »
I prefer to mark them with a brightly coloured stick or ring, and cut every single spear they make until they stop producing - so you get a few spears a week when you usually don't get any. Even a big well-established female will give up after 2 or 3 years of relentless cropping

I forgot to say that there may be a lot of thin little spears before the unwanted plant dies, but I never throw away any thin spears, they are brilliant in stir-fries and cook in step with the other ingredients - even better than chopping big spears lengthways.

Cheers.
With a microholding you always get too much or bugger-all. (I'm fed up calling it an allotment garden - it just encourages the tidy-police).

The simple/complex split is more & more important: Simple fertilisers Poor, complex ones Good. Simple (old) poisons predictable, others (new) the opposite.