Author Topic: Aerating a lawn  (Read 2310 times)

InfraDig

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Aerating a lawn
« on: November 09, 2019, 18:31:23 »
If I use a hollow tine fork, is it okay to use ordinary sharp sand, say from Wickes, in the holes? Could I also use it for top dressing?
Thanks.

Infradig

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Aerating a lawn
« on: November 09, 2019, 18:31:23 »

hippydave

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Re: Aerating a lawn
« Reply #1 on: November 09, 2019, 19:26:00 »
Sand from merchants like contains salt that will not do the lawn any good.
you may be a king or a little street sweeper but sooner or later you dance with de reaper.

Obelixx

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Re: Aerating a lawn
« Reply #2 on: November 10, 2019, 10:28:25 »
I always think a hollow tined fork in soil that needs aerating is going to clog up and be a pain - worse than bulb planters in clay.  I'd just use a normal gardening fork and wiggle it back and forth to enlarge the hole and then brush in dry, sharp sand.

No idea about salt in the sand from Wickes etc but definitely do not use wet builders' sand.
Obxx - Vendée France

Palustris

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Re: Aerating a lawn
« Reply #3 on: November 10, 2019, 13:18:26 »
Sharp sand is not supposed to contain salt. Salt in sand has an effect on concrete so it is usually washed to dissolve and remove the salt.
Easy enough to tell if the sand is from river deposits or sea bed. If it contains broken shells then probably sea sand (which is supposed to be washed). Other test? Taste the stuff!
We have used Wickes sharp sand for years as an admix to compost for years with no trouble at all. Ditto B&M stuff as well.
Gardening is the great leveller.

Tee Gee

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Re: Aerating a lawn
« Reply #4 on: November 10, 2019, 13:48:43 »
Because of all the different terminologies I always look for the term" River Sand"

ancellsfarmer

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Re: Aerating a lawn
« Reply #5 on: November 10, 2019, 14:54:03 »
Before the recent deluge, I treated my lawn to a light dressing of dry FYM, of several years age. Not a proper load, just a good even 'side of the hand' kind of spread. Not only has it turned a better shade of green, but is now well covered in really dark worm casts. Its good to have friends in the right places.
Freelance cultivator qualified within the University of Life.

InfraDig

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Re: Aerating a lawn
« Reply #6 on: November 10, 2019, 21:53:43 »
Many thanks for your replies.

ACE

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Re: Aerating a lawn
« Reply #7 on: November 11, 2019, 12:16:08 »
When we used to do the bowling greens for the local authority. After taking out the plugs we would sweep a mixture of sharp sand and compost  back into all the holes on a dry day, wait for a rain to wash it in proper. Then on the next dry day it would be swept again with grass seed mixed into the sand and compost. Not the right time of year now, best time is late summer or early spring.  Roll it a few weeks later and bingo a nice lawn.

Paulh

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Re: Aerating a lawn
« Reply #8 on: November 23, 2019, 21:11:24 »
Ace, Ace.

 

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