Author Topic: Hibernation time!  (Read 2416 times)

Tee Gee

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Hibernation time!
« on: November 08, 2019, 14:17:31 »
Its that time of year when I more or less close up shop for the season, a season that hasn't been very good really :sad1:

The weather has been so variable.

OK some plants coped with it but others didn't but then again....." There is always next year to look forward to,  and I have prepared these for it"


Allotments 4 All

Hibernation time!
« on: November 08, 2019, 14:17:31 »

Paulines7

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Re: Hibernation time!
« Reply #1 on: November 08, 2019, 14:58:49 »
Tee Gee, are those the plants that are in your greenhouse now to be overwintered or were the photos taken at the beginning of the season?  It all looks very neat and tidy. 

Tee Gee

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Re: Hibernation time!
« Reply #2 on: November 08, 2019, 15:52:37 »
Quote
are those the plants that are in your greenhouse now to be overwintered or were the photos taken at the beginning of the season?

Photos taken this morning and the plants are stock I have purchased or propagated over this season to further renovate my garden next year!

Obelixx

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Re: Hibernation time!
« Reply #3 on: November 08, 2019, 16:28:50 »
Looking good Tee Gee.   All we've done is clear out all the toms from the polytunnel and put down cardboard.  However, expecting a cold night tonight so the lemon, limquat and yuzu pots were moved in there this morning.   
Obxx - Vendée France

Paulines7

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Re: Hibernation time!
« Reply #4 on: November 09, 2019, 11:33:34 »
You have some lovely plants there.  I assume you keep your greenhouse heated throughout the winter, Tee Gee.  What sort of heating do you have?

Tee Gee

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Re: Hibernation time!
« Reply #5 on: November 09, 2019, 12:02:16 »
Quote
I assume you keep your greenhouse heated throughout the winter, Tee Gee.  What sort of heating do you have?

You can see my heating system in the first photo!

The bench the buckets are sitting on is my " Hot bed" which is a thermostatically controlled soil heating cable covered in sand. I have not switched this on yet, that won't happen to around January/February time.

When it is on the go it is set to give a bottom heat of around 65°F (18°C)

Below the bench is a 3 kw "Fan Heater" this is thermostatically controlled as well and is  set to keep the greenhouse at around 38-40°F (4°C) which i find is enough to keep my greenhouse "Frost free"

If needs be I can use the fan in summer to circulate cold/cooler air around the greenhouse although I never really use it!

I also have a heat sensor in both greenhouses which sends signals to the monitors in the house which I keep an eye on regularly.

The heated greenhouse usually takes care of itself but I like to know what is happening in the "cold greenhouse" so that if it gets particularly cold i can go and throw some fleece over the plants.

All in all I find it quite a convenient set up.

In terms of running costs I have no idea nor do I want to. I see my gardening as a hobby and most hobbies involve some costs and this one is no different!


Vinlander

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Re: Hibernation time!
« Reply #6 on: December 10, 2020, 20:17:33 »
All excellent stuff - but I have to say, I have killed 2 greenhouse heaters and one replacement  element by using them as fans in the summer. None of the elements survived a year.

I think the problem is that cold elements are much more brittle, and more likely to be shaken apart than hot ones which are closer to melting point and thus more flexible (metal fatigue?).

After 3 losses I managed to source one that's lasted about 8 years so far - one that only fans while the element is on, and in the summer I only use a "dead" one (after removing the broken element entirely).

Cheers.

PS. I suppose it's also possible that regular heating anneals the metal before cracks appear - but metallurgy isn't really my subject.
With a microholding you always get too much or bugger-all. (I'm fed up calling it an allotment garden - it just encourages the tidy-police).

The simple/complex split is more & more important: Simple fertilisers Poor, complex ones Good. Simple (old) poisons predictable, others (new) the opposite.

ancellsfarmer

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Re: Hibernation time!
« Reply #7 on: December 11, 2020, 11:33:49 »
All excellent stuff - but I have to say, I have killed 2 greenhouse heaters and one replacement  element by using them as fans in the summer. None of the elements survived a year.

I think the problem is that cold elements are much more brittle, and more likely to be shaken apart than hot ones which are closer to melting point and thus more flexible (metal fatigue?).

After 3 losses I managed to source one that's lasted about 8 years so far - one that only fans while the element is on, and in the summer I only use a "dead" one (after removing the broken element entirely).

Cheers.

PS. I suppose it's also possible that regular heating anneals the metal before cracks appear - but metallurgy isn't really my subject.
Issues such as droplets of condensation and damp spiders account for these elements often.
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