Author Topic: goosegogs  (Read 158 times)

ACE

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goosegogs
« on: October 09, 2019, 07:45:44 »
I inherited some gooseberry bushes on this new plot. I have not grown them for years as I am not a lover of the sour little buggers. But somebody gave me a pot of homemade goosegog jam and I really liked it. So advice needed on time of pruning, feeding and general care needed to save me climbing up in to the attic to drag out Percy Thrower's old gardening bible.

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goosegogs
« on: October 09, 2019, 07:45:44 »

Tee Gee

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Re: goosegogs
« Reply #1 on: October 09, 2019, 08:55:40 »

Vinlander

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Re: goosegogs
« Reply #2 on: October 09, 2019, 10:10:15 »
I am not a lover of the sour little buggers.

Sour unripe nearly tasteless gooseberries can still make a good jam, but the main reason that's all you can find in the shops is that they are easier to pick without damage and transport without care - and you get a bigger crop by not letting them mature (like beans and courgettes but without the improved flavour).

A true dessert gooseberry (Pax has a lot of advantages) can produce extremely sweet fruit with a unique taste - not to mention a very slight hint of tartness - just enough to balance it.

Cheers.

With a microholding you always get too much or bugger-all. (I'm fed up calling it an allotment garden - it just encourages the tidy-police).

The simple/complex split is more & more important: Simple fertilisers Poor, complex ones Good. Simple (old) poisons predictable, others (new) the opposite.