Author Topic: Mare's Tail  (Read 1007 times)

Borderers1951

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Mare's Tail
« on: May 11, 2019, 10:28:48 »
I recently took on a second plot on the local site.  I was warned it was badly infested by Mare's Tail and have been digging out shoots and roots for some weeks yet still it comes.  I have decided to give it a good dose of a suitable weedkiller - perhaps several doses.  It's no longer a case of should I use it or not, it's the death penalty now.  I have tested a small segment with a strong glyphosate which does work to some degree but is there anything else which is as  effective or possibly more so?

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Mare's Tail
« on: May 11, 2019, 10:28:48 »

Plot 18

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Re: Mare's Tail
« Reply #1 on: May 11, 2019, 11:46:00 »
Ammonium sulphamate really does kill the stuff, but the EU banned it's use, because it refused to review the data supplied unless it contained details of animal testing on dogs, which the supplier thought would cause unnecessary suffering to animals  :BangHead:
 
You can only buy it to as a compost accelerant now.
See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ammonium_sulfamate and other sites about it and its use.

Tee Gee

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Re: Mare's Tail
« Reply #2 on: May 11, 2019, 12:14:34 »
Although it took a couple of years to get rid of it I found that constant hoe hoe hoeing :icon_santa: :icon_santa: was the answer, I never let it grow higher than 50mm(2") before hoeing it down.

I also found that improving the quality of the soil and making it slightly alkaline seemed to help.

I never tried chemical treatment so can't vouch for this method although it is often recommended!

http://www.thegardenersalmanac.co.uk/Content/M/Mare%27s%20Tail/Mare%27s%20Tail.htm

Beersmith

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Re: Mare's Tail
« Reply #3 on: May 11, 2019, 18:44:23 »
Ammonium sulphamate really does kill the stuff, but the EU banned it's use, because it refused to review the data supplied unless it contained details of animal testing on dogs, which the supplier thought would cause unnecessary suffering to animals  :BangHead:
 
You can only buy it to as a compost accelerant now.
See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ammonium_sulfamate and other sites about it and its use.

It was reported that the Irish rapporteur behaved in a very perverse way in the handling of this case.  Technically it is not banned. It is simply unlicensed. What pressure or incentives might have caused the rapporteur's behaviour? Who can guess?
Not mad, just out to mulch!

nodig

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Re: Mare's Tail
« Reply #4 on: May 11, 2019, 19:30:20 »
I can remember Joe Swift of BBC gardeners world starting his own allotment plot a few years back.  When he found out that his new plot was infested with Mares Tail he enthusiastically asking an old boy for advice.  I had to laugh when the answer he was given was 'give up'.  Funnily enough I think he did after a few more episodes!

ACE

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Re: Mare's Tail
« Reply #5 on: May 12, 2019, 07:32:04 »
I took over a plot on a site once that nobody wanted because of the mares tail. A deep dig over removing all the bits of black root I could find, then as suggested by other posters hoe, hoe, hoe. I grew plenty of stuff on the plot. Can be a nuisance in amongst a row of seedlings but plan your thinning right and you will be ok. I don't think mares tail takes a lot from the soil all it does is look untidy. It would not worry me now, but whatever you do DON'T ROTAVATE.

ancellsfarmer

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Re: Mare's Tail
« Reply #6 on: May 12, 2019, 09:54:34 »
Fortunately never been stressed by the plant, just a matter of luck. Its got its uses,
See:
http://wssa.net/wp-content/themes/WSSA/WorldOfWeeds/horsetail.html
Freelance cultivator qualified within the University of Life.

nodig

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Re: Mare's Tail
« Reply #7 on: May 12, 2019, 17:29:08 »
I have to laugh at the comment that just do a deep dig all over the plot and that gets rid of the Mares Tail.  A deep dig over a standard plot would involve going through 150 cubic metres of soil, getting on for 300 tonnes!.  Of course the experienced allotmenteers on this forum would only take a couple of hours to dig 300 tonnes of soil but for newbies it would take perhaps a lifetime or a bit longer.

Obelixx

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Re: Mare's Tail
« Reply #8 on: May 12, 2019, 18:11:24 »
You have to treat it like you would if you had an elephant to eat.  One bite at a time till it's done!

Digging over beds as you need them and covering the ones you can't get to or don't yet need will get you thru it in do-able chunks.   I had mare's tail in parts of my last garden where the soil was imported, neutral clay.   I just hoed, dug, pulled as appropriate.   

You can make a very good fungicide and rust treatment by soaking mares' tail in a bucket of water for a few weeks (needs a lid) and then strain and dilute 10 parts water to 1 part liquid.   If you use weedkiller, don't make tea, obviously, but do add a bit of washing up liquid to the mix to help it stick and break or crush the stems to help absorption as they contain a lot of silica and can be a bit impervious.   Used to be used as pan scrubs.

Doing the same now in this new garden where the 25 x 29m veg plot is riddled with bindweed.   Clear it one new bed at a time and then keep it hoed.   We leave the roots and shoots out in the sun to dry out completely before they go anywhere near a compost heap.
Obxx - Vendée France

ACE

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Re: Mare's Tail
« Reply #9 on: May 12, 2019, 18:16:46 »
Being a gravedigger for a number of years when I was younger, deep digging was my speciality. :tongue3: It didn't take long to turn a plot over with the right tools, not a silly little garden spade, a nice big heavy builders shovel worked a treat for me. Getting on a bit now so piddly little tools are the norm. But it keeps me fit.

Tee Gee

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Re: Mare's Tail
« Reply #10 on: May 12, 2019, 19:08:30 »
Quote
of course the experienced allotmenteers on this forum would only take a couple of hours to dig 300 tonnes of soil but for newbies it would take perhaps a lifetime or a bit longer.

Well a couple of hours for a whole plot is pushing it a bit, but I used to dig and muck one of these beds in under 3 hours and found it to be quite therapeutic and more than that most beneficial to my soil.



The best bit about digging say one spit deep is you can generally keep on top of all the most problematic of weeds e.g mares tail, dandelions, docks to name but a few.

I have always maintained that a plot's output is relative to the gardener's input!

So as they say up here in Yorkshire......nout in nout out!

Then there is the more common saying......you reap what you sow!

Now that I have retired from allotmenteering I think I could say that having tried many of the new fangled  methods such as " no dig" or "raised beds" one spit deep digging always gave me my best results!

So I guess if you make your own bed then it it is up to you to accept it!( ok lie in it!) :thumbsup:





Tiny Clanger

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Re: Mare's Tail
« Reply #11 on: June 01, 2019, 10:03:31 »
Unfortunately the ONLY ones I know of are not suitable for use on an allotment.  :BangHead:
I expect to pass through this world but once; any good thing therefore that I can do, or any kindness that I can show to any fellow creature, let me do it now; let me not defer or neglect it, for I shall not pass this way again.