Author Topic: Recommendations for chillies  (Read 277 times)

George the Pigman

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Recommendations for chillies
« on: February 11, 2019, 21:47:12 »
I generally always grown Cayenne as a chilli but its boring but reliable. Any recommendations for interesting chillies now I am sorting out my seeds for this year.

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Recommendations for chillies
« on: February 11, 2019, 21:47:12 »

Obelixx

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Re: Recommendations for chillies
« Reply #1 on: February 11, 2019, 22:13:55 »
I like Bulgarian Carrot and Hungarian Hot Wax - both hot but not volcanic and attractive fruits too.

Black Hungarian is mild and an attractive dark purple/black colour.
Obxx - Vendée France

BarriedaleNick

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Re: Recommendations for chillies
« Reply #2 on: February 12, 2019, 08:13:29 »
Trinidad Perfume is fun.   No heat at all but taste exactly like they should be hot - really nice flavour.
John's Super Long - quite hot and up to a foot long - fun to grow.
Bird's Eye - For that authentic SE Asian taste.
Padron - mild and great for stuffing.
Lemon Drop - Hot with a citrus taste
Biquinho - small, mild and fruity
Prairie Fire - small plants, quick to ripen and quite hot - good for indoors.
If you want something hot then try Carolina Reaper or Trinidad Scorpion.  Too hot for me but good for adding heat to sauces.

Vinlander

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Re: Recommendations for chillies
« Reply #3 on: February 15, 2019, 10:21:30 »
Tobago Seasoning has a rich Habanero flavour and no more than medium heat - I can enjoy eating a raw one without too much pain. They are a bit quicker to mature than Trinidad Perfume. If you grow enough you can make chilli sauce that is as hot as Encona/Tabasco but with twice the flavour.

Bulgarian Teardrop has citrus notes like Lemon Drop but moreso - probably closer to Aji Amarillo but with half the heat - another interesting sauce chilli and very good added to Asian food - best raw and diced to 1 or 2mm to maximise the overtones of citrus & under-ripe guava and scattered on at the last minute - especially if not everyone wants chilli... Also good to liven up glut-buster veg stews.

All the rocoto/locoto/manzano chillies are middling to hot (very dependent on the season). They are 100% perennial if overwintered at 4C and don't sulk in the spring - they are never overtaken by the next year's seedlings. The first years crop will be mostly green but that isn't a problem because though the green ones are milder they taste more like black pepper in the background than chilli in the foreground - brilliant for lifting milder food (eg Italian and English) to a more delicious level.

I also recommend the mini-sweet  peppers (chiquino? look like fat jalapenos). They have a different sweet-pepper flavour that's much less bland and without heat. Buy a pack at your local supermarket - the orange ones are best so take their seeds and sow them soon. Not the cheapest peppers but certainly the cheapest seeds and very easy to grow - and you'll know exactly what the flavour is going to be.

Cheers.
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The simple/complex split is more & more important: Simple fertilisers Poor, complex ones Good. Simple (old) poisons predictable, others (new) the opposite.

 

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