Author Topic: Glyphosphate  (Read 1093 times)

Digeroo

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Glyphosphate
« on: February 02, 2019, 08:25:22 »
I would like to stop people spraying Glyphosate about the place.  There was one guy who was always doing it, and did not seem to notice it was blowing all over the place in the wind.  He has now died of cancer!!  Make of that what you will.

Another couple sprayed the weeds on their plot and it  blew all over my raspberries which died.  I am pleased to say that they have given up.    Though overwise they were very nice.

Allotments 4 All

Glyphosphate
« on: February 02, 2019, 08:25:22 »

Obelixx

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Re: Glyphosphate
« Reply #1 on: February 02, 2019, 12:41:33 »
It is now banned here, as of the new year, along with many other chemicals no longer available to gardeners.

Years ago when we were just starting to plant a wind break of shrubs along the boundary our Belgian garden the farmer came and sprayed the arable field behind.
  I managed to save the shrubs by cleaning them down with the hose but the perennials and veggies I'd planted inside those all died.   A quiet word with him was enough to make him more careful about wind direction and strength so no more problems.
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Beersmith

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Re: Glyphosphate
« Reply #2 on: February 02, 2019, 14:44:44 »
It is now banned here, as of the new year, along with many other chemicals no longer available to gardeners.


Can you provide an update. I had thought the French parliament voted against a ban around September last year. Has something happened since?
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Beersmith

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Re: Glyphosphate
« Reply #3 on: February 02, 2019, 15:12:11 »
If you stole produce from another plot you would be evicted. If you went onto another plot and damaged their shed or trampled on their crops you would be evicted.  If you let your dog foul paths or other people's plots you should be evicted.

It is all quite simple. If your actions cause any appreciable damage or harm you are obstructing the freedom of other plot holders to enjoy their plot. You have no one to blame but yourself if you get evicted.

I never spray glyphosate, but have used it in small amounts as a contact herbicide to wipe onto the leaves of particularly stubborn perennial weeds. But if you want to use it, I'm indifferent to you causing yourself harm, just make sure you don't inflict it on others.
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Obelixx

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Re: Glyphosphate
« Reply #4 on: February 02, 2019, 18:47:40 »
Beersmith - https://www.journaldesfemmes.fr/jardin/jardinage/1719901-pesticides-interdits-dans-jardins-particuliers/ 

Effective from 1st of January, no more chemical pesticides, herbicides and fungicides for non-professional use   
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Beersmith

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Re: Glyphosphate
« Reply #5 on: February 02, 2019, 21:06:54 »
Beersmith - https://www.journaldesfemmes.fr/jardin/jardinage/1719901-pesticides-interdits-dans-jardins-particuliers/ 

Effective from 1st of January, no more chemical pesticides, herbicides and fungicides for non-professional use

Thank you. My French is a bit limited.  Banned for non professional use, though a wider ban for professional users seems to be still planned across the EU but not yet implemented?
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nodig

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Re: Glyphosphate
« Reply #6 on: February 02, 2019, 21:28:10 »
The RHS still recommend glyphosate for clearing new allotments and so do I.  I have used it for years as a gardener and I'm not dead yet - just saying.  Most people die of something, so don't worry too much, life is too short.

Obelixx

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Re: Glyphosphate
« Reply #7 on: February 02, 2019, 21:55:36 »
Public spaces in France have had the restriction for longer already.   I have no idea if it applies to farmers and market gardeners and so on.
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Beersmith

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Re: Glyphosphate
« Reply #8 on: February 05, 2019, 15:21:01 »
The RHS still recommend glyphosate for clearing new allotments and so do I.  I have used it for years as a gardener and I'm not dead yet - just saying.  Most people die of something, so don't worry too much, life is too short.

Perhaps you are missing the point.  Lots of things are carcinogenic, including such everyday stuff as toast (acrilamide), bacon (nitrosamines), alcohol, nuts that have been incorrectly stored (aflatoxins), tobacco smoking, too much sunlight (UV radiation), exhaust from diesel vehicles, the list is very long.

But for many items on the list it is the individual who decides if they want to take the risk. For example, you can choose to eat bacon if you wish or not as you prefer. People have every right to object when others take away that choice and impose their decision. So using glyphosate is up to you and under current regulations is your right, but be aware you have no right to impose your decision on others by allowing any spray to drift onto their plants plot or ground.

As it happens, I happen to think glyphosate is probably not highly carcinogenic. If it was the many thousands of tons used annually by farmers for decades would have provided signals by now. It may well prove mildly carcinogenic with prolonged exposure at high concentrations, though these are just my opinions. Either way, your choice is your risk, I think we are being asked to be kind enough not to impose our choices on others.
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hippydave

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Re: Glyphosphate
« Reply #9 on: February 05, 2019, 19:37:05 »
I am a professional user and have my PA1 and PA6 spraying certificates and you learn a lot about drift and over spray and there are very hefty fines if this happens. Products such as glyphosate in my mind should only be used by trained persons. Most people who use it at home and on allotments etc have no idea of spray drift and do not know that in certain weather conditions the spray can be carried and land on off target plants and most of the time they vastly overdose the weeds they are spraying. If I affected plants not intended for spraying I could face a very large fine but joe public can spary the stuff willie nillie.  I would be having a word with anyone who just sprays indiscriminately. 
you may be a king or a little street sweeper but sooner or later you dance with de reaper.

nodig

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Re: Glyphosphate
« Reply #10 on: February 05, 2019, 19:47:02 »
Spraying safely is not difficult.  I set the spray on a very coarse setting - i.e. set it for a continuous jet and then take it back a notch.  The result is small droplets rather than a fine mist.  Then hold the nozzel just a few inches above the weeds, so in fact it is more like giving the weeds a shower than anything else.  I move the head rapidly from side to side so as to not overdose the weeds.  I can spray within inches of flowers in a garden with no ill effects on the flowers themselves.  Not sure what Beersmith means when he says that I may be missing the point, perhaps he missed my point.

ancellsfarmer

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Re: Glyphosphate
« Reply #11 on: February 06, 2019, 11:39:17 »
I believe the contention of other peoples spray drift would be negated
 IF: the application was by low pressure means.
Dribble bars (such as used for Weedol),
watering cans (dedicated) with fine roses.
 Attention to still air, such as very early morning, etc.
Whether one should use it is very much a personal decision.
Much of the noise of discussion is deeply entrenched in dispute with Monsanto and other Globalist traders,around DNA engineering etc.
 Unfortunately , Governments are too closely attached to Globalists, and their money. Independent science is almost impossible.
Within an allotment environment, perhaps useage should be by ticketed operatives, such as Hippydave, and undertaken to reclaim overgrown plots prior to letting. Subsequent use by 'plotters' would not be necessary if they maintain their ground correctly.
Personally , I have used glysophate in extreme cases to reclaim, but the need has not existed for me for 4 seasons at least.
Freelance cultivator qualified within the University of Life.

squeezyjohn

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Re: Glyphosphate
« Reply #12 on: February 08, 2019, 17:03:31 »
Ammonium sulphamate all the way for me if I'm reclaiming the land.  No nasty chemicals, kills everything stone dead, and breaks down in to Ammonium Sulphate which is a fertilizer.  I know it's banned as a weedkiller, but not for any good reason, and it's permitted to be used as a compost accelerator ... I just like beginning the composting process while the weeds are still growing!

You need to leave it two or three months after applying before using the land ... but for reclamation purposes it's excellent.

Obelixx

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Re: Glyphosphate
« Reply #13 on: February 08, 2019, 17:39:09 »
How do you manage to apply it without anyone realising what you're up to?   Or being shopped?

I have noticed that municipal plantings in La Roche have been given flexible metal borders 3 or 4 inches high above grass level to encircle their usually organic rather than rectangular shapes.  They have been thoroughly weeded over the winter and then given some topdressing and finally a thick layer of chipped bark to finish them off.   I'm assuming this is part of the programme to eliminate the use of pesticides and herbicides in public spaces.   
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squeezyjohn

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Re: Glyphosphate
« Reply #14 on: February 10, 2019, 19:14:09 »
I just apply it at the correct concentration with a little detergent added (washing up liquid) mixed up in a weedkiller labeled watering can.  Nobody has asked me what it was.  I doubt anyone would care on our site.  I make sure I avoid my plot margins by at least 18 inches and also avoid anywhere where wanted tree roots might be because it would obviously affect those as well.

For tree stumps that are still alive, I just drill holes in them and fill with neat crystals ... their composting is much accelerated once they're stone dead  :sunny: :sunny:

 

anything