Author Topic: Annual seed audit  (Read 737 times)

gwynleg

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Annual seed audit
« on: January 11, 2019, 12:08:20 »
Well Ive done the seed audit (sorting out what Ive got and what I need). My conclusion is that Ive got a lot of seeds! I only had half an allotment ready last year and didnt want to put in winter veg last year as I want the plot clear for more preparation/building raised beds. So I must have put my energy into buying seeds instead!

Iím delighted to find that I havenít got any climbing bean seeds though so I can still have a little seed shop!

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Annual seed audit
« on: January 11, 2019, 12:08:20 »

Plot 18

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Re: Annual seed audit
« Reply #1 on: January 11, 2019, 13:33:40 »
My audit showed I didn't NEED any! Didn't stop me buying some though :toothy10:

Obelixx

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Re: Annual seed audit
« Reply #2 on: January 11, 2019, 14:05:30 »
When we moved I realised I had an awful lot of seeds and, being winter and unable to start anything, I actually sat and coded them into a spreadsheet.  Haven't shown OH cos it's embarrassing and, of course, we've changed climates so I still need news seeds...........
Obxx - Vendťe France

johhnyco15

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Re: Annual seed audit
« Reply #3 on: January 11, 2019, 19:22:33 »
My audit showed I didn't NEED any! Didn't stop me buying some though :toothy10:
i feel your pain only needed 3 pkts of incredible sweetcorn £25 later ahhhh
johhnyc015  may the plot be with you

ancellsfarmer

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Re: Annual seed audit
« Reply #4 on: January 12, 2019, 20:02:24 »
The gamble is that , unless you spend time testing, you won't know which have'died' and will fail to grow. The packet date may be a clue but the ageing has begun. The cost of a lost planting goes beyond the seed element, you only get one chance for that ideal sowing time.
My seed budget is no more than about £40 for vegetables and I try to not chance suspect varieties. Therefore new seed annually for carrots, onions, parsnips, lettuce at least.
The mitigation by 'disposing' of 'old' stock via use as microgreens, growing to produce plants to sell at local bootsale*, even give to 'friends'. Final route out is to mix into the next years bird seed mix. Nothing wasted- net result is a return  beyond the cost, and effectively 'free, fresh seed every year.
* also great to use excess home saved runner bean seed- 20 beans in 1" of waste compost in a mushroom tray  £4 ! Good returns on courgettes for example- Lidl seed, 12 seeds-49p.Plant plenty, pick the best for self All others, put in a scrap 3" pot. Easily £1 each
Freelance cultivator qualified within the University of Life.

gwynleg

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Re: Annual seed audit
« Reply #5 on: January 13, 2019, 07:25:54 »
Yes I find that I do well with older seeds and itís only things like parsnips and carrots that I definitely look fresh seeds.  I do tend to put too many seeds in anyway I usually get a good enough return ...

ACE

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Re: Annual seed audit
« Reply #6 on: January 13, 2019, 09:54:33 »
All new fresh veg seed for me this year. Last years beans were showing signs of cross pollination, I chucked all my old veg seeds in the seed swap box at the allotments and took flower seeds to put in the community garden I have started for the site. The Range were selling off loads of branded seeds last autumn all in date and I have just got a variety of climbing beans. All I have to get is the spuds now and worry about not having enough room. I have my eye on an unused half plot just in case.

Beersmith

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Re: Annual seed audit
« Reply #7 on: January 13, 2019, 13:25:14 »
Yes I find that I do well with older seeds and itís only things like parsnips and carrots that I definitely look fresh seeds.  I do tend to put too many seeds in anyway I usually get a good enough return ...

Agreed.  I always buy fresh parsnip seeds each year.

Now an admission. I have been doing this for a long time, and am not sure I have ever tried old parsnip seeds to see how well they germinate. So is this just an old wives tale? Or do parsnip seeds actually deteriorate quickly?

Not mad, just out to mulch!

galina

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Re: Annual seed audit
« Reply #8 on: January 13, 2019, 15:09:15 »
Yes I find that I do well with older seeds and itís only things like parsnips and carrots that I definitely look fresh seeds.  I do tend to put too many seeds in anyway I usually get a good enough return ...

Agreed.  I always buy fresh parsnip seeds each year.

Now an admission. I have been doing this for a long time, and am not sure I have ever tried old parsnip seeds to see how well they germinate. So is this just an old wives tale? Or do parsnip seeds actually deteriorate quickly?



Yes, they do deteriorate quickly.  If you want to grow from second year parsnip seed, you are advised to germinate on a damp kitchen towel inside a freezer bag to keep moisture in, then take individually chitted plants off with tweezers and plant into finely worked soil.  This way a low germination rate does not matter.  I have heard quotes of 5 to 10 percent germination only for second year parsnips.

Alternatively, a half seed packet can be closed with sellotape, put into a small jar with a drying agent (dry rice or dessicant sachets), sealed and frozen.

I have parsnip seeds in the freezer that has lasted many years.  I find that the tubes that fizzy vitamin tablets come in are very suitable for the purpose of freezing.  These lids have drying agents in the top.  Of course the seed must be fully dry before freezing.  Also one tube of parsnip seeds is the right portion for 3 or 4 rows  :wave:

early weeder

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Re: Annual seed audit
« Reply #9 on: January 13, 2019, 16:18:17 »
I had read that you should buy new parsnip seed every year so put my old seed on the bird table. I later then tried to work out what the nice foliage was in the flower bed and it seems that seed had germinated pretty well!

saddad

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Re: Annual seed audit
« Reply #10 on: January 15, 2019, 19:21:31 »
That's so and so's law EW

Multiveg

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Re: Annual seed audit
« Reply #11 on: February 05, 2019, 16:10:32 »
Parsnips are evil. The leaves that is - especially on sunny days and you brush up against them with skin. Blisters!

I have far too many seeds. I buy seeds, I love buying seeds (and also supplies for a different hobby). Then, there are the seeds on the gardening magazines. Do I really need yet more tomato, leek, carrot seeds.. yes, because I don't want Ailsa Craig/Moneymaker, and Early Nantes, etc... I want to pick my own choices!

Some of my old saved HSL beans didn't germinate last year. Probably got enough beans one way or another for a bean bag (and not the type to throw)!
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