Author Topic: Move apple trees in pots to the allotment or just buy new?  (Read 390 times)

davholla

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Move apple trees in pots to the allotment or just buy new?
« on: December 27, 2018, 12:26:22 »
I have 2 M9 trees in pots and they rarely fruit because when I go on holiday no one waters them and they lose their apples.  The tree in the garden does well despite this.
I have an allotment and am thinking of moving them but would they cope? Would it be easier to just buy some?  I am not too sure if I like these varieties that much.

I am really confused.

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Move apple trees in pots to the allotment or just buy new?
« on: December 27, 2018, 12:26:22 »

Tee Gee

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Re: Move apple trees in pots to the allotment or just buy new?
« Reply #1 on: December 27, 2018, 14:25:24 »
Quote
I have an allotment and am thinking of moving them but would they cope?

I see no reason why not!

Quote
Would it be easier to just buy some? 
I am not too sure if I like these varieties that much.

 That's is a question that only you can answer

But personally I would say if you have the space try it, and if after a couple of years you are not satisfied then replace them.

Beersmith

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Re: Move apple trees in pots to the allotment or just buy new?
« Reply #2 on: December 27, 2018, 16:51:43 »
M9 is a widely used rootstock, even in commercial apple growing. It will produce a smallish tree, but doesn't need too much room so you can get a good crop of apples without needing too much space. Minor disadvantages are that it will need staking, and will be happier not grassed down. Advantages are that all fruit will be within reach of an adult and that the individual apples tend to be fairly large.

As for the scion, well that is a matter of your own personal taste. You did not mention the varieties. If you do move them to the allotment, worth checking on pollinators, but no reason to think you will have any difficulties.

If you do intend to move them, make sure you do this while they are still dormant. The next couple of months would be ideal.
« Last Edit: December 27, 2018, 16:55:45 by Beersmith »
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winecap

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Re: Move apple trees in pots to the allotment or just buy new?
« Reply #3 on: December 27, 2018, 18:32:49 »
I was given a couple of trees that had been in pots and had stopped fruiting. I planted them at the allotment and they immediately fruited, but not until this year, I think the third harvest, have they finally started to grow significantly and have produced much larger apples. I suspect this was all due to being root bound, and they have finally spread their roots. I perhaps should have been more brutal with the roots when first planting them out. Interestingly, the fruit is also tasting better. Not sure whether any of that will help with your decision, but you may find it relevant.

davholla

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Re: Move apple trees in pots to the allotment or just buy new?
« Reply #4 on: December 27, 2018, 19:19:41 »
Quote
I have an allotment and am thinking of moving them but would they cope?

I see no reason why not!

Quote
Would it be easier to just buy some? 
I am not too sure if I like these varieties that much.

 That's is a question that only you can answer

But personally I would say if you have the space try it, and if after a couple of years you are not satisfied then replace them.
 

Thank you.  I just wondered if moving apple trees would be too much of a shock for them and kill them or put them back so much if it was not worth it.
I did a search but couldn't find anything relevant, so I hoped that the experts here would know.

Beersmith

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Re: Move apple trees in pots to the allotment or just buy new?
« Reply #5 on: December 27, 2018, 20:33:31 »
Purely out of interest, what varieties do you have?

P.S.  I agree with the others. Good rich soil and a bit of TLC, I'd be very surprised if they did not do well. And I would emphasise again, get those roots settled in while dormant so they get away to a flying start next spring.
« Last Edit: December 27, 2018, 20:45:59 by Beersmith »
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galina

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Re: Move apple trees in pots to the allotment or just buy new?
« Reply #6 on: December 27, 2018, 22:31:49 »
Their roots may be quite potbound and restricted, I would soak them, and spend some time teasing the roots apart before you plant them on the allotment, if that is what you decide in the end.  :wave:

Paulh

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Re: Move apple trees in pots to the allotment or just buy new?
« Reply #7 on: December 28, 2018, 08:50:45 »
If you do move them to the allotment, worth checking on pollinators, but no reason to think you will have any difficulties.

Also worth checking that they are not the only pollinators around for the tree in your garden.

Vinlander

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Re: Move apple trees in pots to the allotment or just buy new?
« Reply #8 on: December 28, 2018, 12:45:19 »
Purely out of interest, what varieties do you have?

There are two types of apple lovers and it seems to be a cultural thing as it seems to run in families.

I've also encountered families that are lukewarm about apples and can't even be bothered trying new ones that are in the shops or heritage ones that aren't.

I would divide the lovers into those who seem to be looking for the flavour of apple pie (soft, sweet apples, not too sharp or intensely flavoured - they prefer their Cox to have matured in store), and people like my family and my wife's family who prefer their apples straight from the tree (sharp, sweet, crisp & juicy apples - often keeper varieties that used to be recommended for store because the ghost of their intense flavour is still there in March).

I can't recommend the softy apples - to me they are only fit for juicing.

My favourite zingy apples are Ashmeads Kernel (AGM), William Crump (a non-mealy red!), Orleans Reinette & Ribston Pippin & Court of Wick (all 3 similar to, but better and far easier than Cox), Pitmaston Pineapple, Ross Nonpareil, Suntan... and Darcy Spice (but not on heavy soil like mine - it can be shy). As a keeper I'd recommend Sturmer Pippin - also good cooked though it's a waste. All but the newest of these were recommended by Bunyard.

I don't like many earlies (not enough flavour or zing)* but if you stretch a point to Egremont Russet  then it's the first of the real flavour apples - a little soft for my taste but the unique pear/hazelnut  flavour redeems it.

Cheers.

*Even the welcome earlies like Worcester Pearmain are mostly wasted - you just can't eat a treeful before they fade to mediocrity. If you have to have a tree then make it an M27 rootstock - and/or create a family tree for the 2 or 3 earlies you like best. This latter strategy is how I'm rationalising my earlies.

PS. Egremont Russet is a pitcher apple (it will root in water, though if has a fence to its North the lower branches will start making visible roots - those branches can be cut off & will root if treated like giant blackcurrant prunings). It is far too vigorous for an allotment UNLESS you graft on something that's already a bit dwarf - like Pitmaston Pineapple. May Queen trees are even smaller.

With a microholding you always get too much or bugger-all. (I'm fed up calling it an allotment garden - it just encourages the tidy-police).

The simple/complex split is more & more important: Simple fertilisers Poor, complex ones Good. Simple (old) poisons predictable, others (new) the opposite.

davholla

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Re: Move apple trees in pots to the allotment or just buy new?
« Reply #9 on: December 28, 2018, 20:41:10 »
Thank you all for the words of advice.  If I do move them - how should I do it?

Beersmith

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Re: Move apple trees in pots to the allotment or just buy new?
« Reply #10 on: December 28, 2018, 23:42:04 »
Thank you all for the words of advice.  If I do move them - how should I do it?

See the post from Galina above. That sounds like good advice to me.
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Beersmith

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Re: Move apple trees in pots to the allotment or just buy new?
« Reply #11 on: December 28, 2018, 23:56:17 »
Purely out of interest, what varieties do you have?


My favourite zingy apples are Ashmeads Kernel (AGM), William Crump (a non-mealy red!), Orleans Reinette & Ribston Pippin & Court of Wick (all 3 similar to, but better and far easier than Cox), Pitmaston Pineapple, Ross Nonpareil, Suntan... and Darcy Spice (but not on heavy soil like mine - it can be shy). As a keeper I'd recommend Sturmer Pippin - also good cooked though it's a waste. All but the newest of these were recommended by Bunyard.

 . . . create a family tree for the 2 or 3 earlies you like best. This latter strategy is how I'm rationalising my earlies.


Space is at a premium for me too.  At the allotment, I have five trees on M9 and four on M27. At home, just two.  I'd love a William Crump.  Top grafting onto another tree is an interesting idea.
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davholla

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Re: Move apple trees in pots to the allotment or just buy new?
« Reply #12 on: December 29, 2018, 11:20:28 »
Their roots may be quite potbound and restricted, I would soak them, and spend some time teasing the roots apart before you plant them on the allotment, if that is what you decide in the end.  :wave:
Thank you, sorry I didn't see this one How long should I soak them for?  A few hours?

galina

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Re: Move apple trees in pots to the allotment or just buy new?
« Reply #13 on: December 29, 2018, 11:34:24 »
Quote
Thank you, sorry I didn't see this one How long should I soak them for?  A few hours?

Overnight in the bath tub unless you have a very large Belfast sink or similar.  A bit messy, but this might be the only way to get all the roots immersed.  Soaking them without the pots is more effective than still inside the pots  :wave:
« Last Edit: December 29, 2018, 11:36:55 by galina »

davholla

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Re: Move apple trees in pots to the allotment or just buy new?
« Reply #14 on: December 29, 2018, 11:36:47 »
Their roots may be quite potbound and restricted, I would soak them, and spend some time teasing the roots apart before you plant them on the allotment, if that is what you decide in the end.  :wave:
Thank you, sorry I didn't see this one How long should I soak them for?  A few hours?
Their roots may be quite potbound and restricted, I would soak them, and spend some time teasing the roots apart before you plant them on the allotment, if that is what you decide in the end.  :wave:
Thank you, sorry I didn't see this one How long should I soak them for?  A few hours?

Overnight in the bath tub unless you have a very large Belfast sink or similar.  A bit messy, but this might be the only way to get all the roots immersed.  Soaking them without the pots is more effective than still inside the pots  :wave:
Could I put them in the pond?  That would be more popular with the wife.

galina

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Re: Move apple trees in pots to the allotment or just buy new?
« Reply #15 on: December 29, 2018, 11:38:59 »
Sounds feasible.  As long as you can submerge the roots without too much soil going into the pond.  But I would not do this during a freezing night.  :wave:

galina

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Re: Move apple trees in pots to the allotment or just buy new?
« Reply #16 on: December 29, 2018, 12:17:41 »
Plant them the same height as they were in the pot, not lower, in a hole wide and deep enough to take the teased out roots, backfill, gently heel the soil down with your shoes, but do not compact too much, stake and water.  If the soil around the roots should sink, then add a bit more or even better make it level again with a few shovels of good compost to give the tree a start. If you are on clay, when you dig the hole initially,  make sure that the subsoil is slightly broken up too, this is to provide drainage, as you do not want rain water to collect in your planting hole and stay there like in a sink that has a plug in.  If you have fairly free draining soil you need not bother  :wave: 

Vinlander

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Re: Move apple trees in pots to the allotment or just buy new?
« Reply #17 on: December 30, 2018, 12:51:34 »
Best practice recommends square holes (discourage circling roots), no fertiliser for the tree, just a bit to get the soil back to normal,  and putting a 1m square of black plastic around the trunk (not tight - it's just to stabilise soil moisture).

If it's not well drained, or it's something hardy but a bit exotic (like Acca) then planting in a mound will get the lower roots further away from the water table and the black plastic will become a flat cone - all the better keep the excess rain off.

Cheers.
With a microholding you always get too much or bugger-all. (I'm fed up calling it an allotment garden - it just encourages the tidy-police).

The simple/complex split is more & more important: Simple fertilisers Poor, complex ones Good. Simple (old) poisons predictable, others (new) the opposite.

davholla

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Re: Move apple trees in pots to the allotment or just buy new?
« Reply #18 on: December 31, 2018, 17:09:47 »
Thank you for all your help.  I went to move them today and found that one had been badly damaged and is not worth moving.  The other one was so root bound and big that I tried but decided not to move, the idea gave me stomach pains.
Thanks again anyway.  I think buying some new ones is easiest.
I think moving could be a good idea for someone more able than me.

 

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