Author Topic: No dig system and the moon  (Read 1454 times)

ancellsfarmer

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Re: No dig system and the moon
« Reply #20 on: December 16, 2018, 18:42:32 »
Quote

In fact my thoughts during this summer were if this type of weather continues the breeders will have to get the finger out and breed new species to replace the indigenous British plant species that are not designed for weather  such as we have had this year. What I noticed  on my plot was that species that originated from warmer climes did quite well, but the indigenous stuff faired quite poorly.

Maybe we/they might do better to revert to 'heirloom' varieties, which have traits/characteristics from earlier than the generally regarded reference point for "global warming analysis", being 1968. This would deliver the features of open pollination, avoiding the F1 characteristic of uniform development and 'success or failure' as the planted crop could still deliver a satisfactory outcome.
If more science was invested in exploring climatically the recent past: that is ,say, back to AD45, (Roman times), where Mediterranean crops seem to have thrived here, the current phenomenon  might be put into historical context.
Always the debate avoids the true issue, burgeoning population worldwide, all expecting to "be modern".
SEE:
https://climate.nasa.gov/climate_resources/9/graphic-earths-temperature-record/
Freelance cultivator qualified within the University of Life.

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Re: No dig system and the moon
« Reply #20 on: December 16, 2018, 18:42:32 »

Beersmith

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Re: No dig system and the moon
« Reply #21 on: December 18, 2018, 22:01:05 »
Quote

What I noticed  on my plot was that species that originated from warmer climes did quite well, but the indigenous stuff faired quite poorly.

Maybe we/they might do better to revert to 'heirloom' varieties


I tend to agree. Although I'd see the preservation of genetic diversity of all sorts as the key issue..

Many many years ago, working alongside veterinarians at that time, I became aware of the marked decline in numbers for many breeds of pig. They were simply unsuited to intensive production methods. Today things are not much better, and the saddleback, Gloucester old spot, Tamworth and several others native breeds, while not close to extinction, are very few in numbers.  Yet some of these breeds are superbly suited to outdoor breeding, and forage based farming systems. It would be incredibly stupid to let these breeds disappear. Nothing sentimental about this, rather they might prove incredibly valuable if we need to move away from highly intensive meat production methods.

Not mad, just out to mulch!

Obelixx

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Re: No dig system and the moon
« Reply #22 on: December 18, 2018, 23:18:47 »
Round here there are lots of free range piggies mucking about in open fields with little Anderson shelters for homes.   There were plenty in Belgium too towards the end of our time there but every single one is pink.  I worry about them getting sunburn.

We have wild boar roaming around in herds of 20+ in local woods.  We see them on the move when the hunters are about.   Apart form not wanting them woandering into my garden I do enjoy seeing them but wonder how they will fare should they discover and break into the farmed piggy fields just a couple of kms to the other side of us.
Obxx - Vendée France

nodig

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Re: No dig system and the moon
« Reply #23 on: December 19, 2018, 16:39:03 »
My guide to successful growing.  Buy cheap seeds - never over a £1, it only encourages them.  Look at the instructions.  Follow the instructions.  Go down the pub after sowing seeds and talk about football for a couple of months or write a book on cultivating by the moon.  Pop back to your allotment avoiding the allotment police (possibly at night) and quickly dig up stuff that looks edible, if you can find them, amongst all the natural plants (weeds).  Avoid planting brassicas unless you are a masochist.  Plant by the sun not the moon i.e. during the day and don't follow other gardeners advice - they are normally wrong.  This is the no work system - it isn't very productive but of course you have good old tesco just around the corner with lots of veg grown by farmers who have done all the work for you. Happy days. ps don't ever spread manure - it is far too much like hard work and also a bit smelly.

ancellsfarmer

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Re: No dig system and the moon
« Reply #24 on: December 19, 2018, 19:48:36 »
My guide to successful growing.  Buy cheap seeds - never over a £1, it only encourages them.  Look at the instructions.  Follow the instructions.  Go down the pub after sowing seeds and talk about football for a couple of months or write a book on cultivating by the moon.  Pop back to your allotment avoiding the allotment police (possibly at night) and quickly dig up stuff that looks edible, if you can find them, amongst all the natural plants (weeds).  Avoid planting brassicas unless you are a masochist.  Plant by the sun not the moon i.e. during the day and don't follow other gardeners advice - they are normally wrong.  This is the no work system - it isn't very productive but of course you have good old tesco just around the corner with lots of veg grown by farmers who have done all the work for you. Happy days. ps don't ever spread manure - it is far too much like hard work and also a bit smelly.
Guess that luna'tics' all the boxes!
Freelance cultivator qualified within the University of Life.

Beersmith

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Re: No dig system and the moon
« Reply #25 on: December 19, 2018, 22:00:43 »
My guide to successful growing.  Buy cheap seeds - never over a £1, it only encourages them.  Look at the instructions.  Follow the instructions.  Go down the pub after sowing seeds and talk about football for a couple of months or write a book on cultivating by the moon.  Pop back to your allotment avoiding the allotment police (possibly at night) and quickly dig up stuff that looks edible, if you can find them, amongst all the natural plants (weeds).  Avoid planting brassicas unless you are a masochist.  Plant by the sun not the moon i.e. during the day and don't follow other gardeners advice - they are normally wrong.  This is the no work system - it isn't very productive but of course you have good old tesco just around the corner with lots of veg grown by farmers who have done all the work for you. Happy days. ps don't ever spread manure - it is far too much like hard work and also a bit smelly.

I think this is what is called " thinking outside the raided bed".
Not mad, just out to mulch!

galina

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Re: No dig system and the moon
« Reply #26 on: December 20, 2018, 06:12:31 »
You do hold the record for most evicted on here though nodig  :glasses9:

all starting to makes sense  :drunken_smilie:

Beersmith

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Re: No dig system and the moon
« Reply #27 on: December 20, 2018, 10:11:51 »
Pop back to your allotment avoiding the allotment police (possibly at night).  Quickly dig up stuff that looks edible.

I think I see where you may be going wrong.

Pop back to your allotment avoiding the allotment police (possibly at night).  Make sure that you are on your own plot. Quickly dig up stuff that looks edible.

There, fixed it for you.
Not mad, just out to mulch!

woodypecks

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Re: No dig system and the moon
« Reply #28 on: January 05, 2019, 10:31:13 »
I hope you dont mind me joining in the conversation at this late stage..but I ,m hoping you had a lovely Christmas and that maybe you were given a little Christmas pocket money to spend . Here are a couple of book titles that I think might suit you .
How to Grow Your own Food by Dirty Nails .....you can follow this month by month ..a cheerfully ,nature lovingly written book .
Beeton's Shilling Gardening Book......an antique book that I wouldn't be without....again month by month advise and it is very interesting to compare the weather notes given .
Also any of Bob Flowerdew's gardening books are excellent !
Charles Dowding's books are far more than just "no dig" ...excellent !      Debbie    :coffee2:
Trespassers will be composted !

 

anything