Author Topic: Unusual greens  (Read 280 times)

AnnieD

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Unusual greens
« on: November 08, 2018, 08:43:41 »
A few weeks, ago, I had an empty bed and some free seeds. So I planted some rows, not expecting a lot.

I now have lovely rows of Spinach, Chinese Cabbage, Chinese Kale, and Bok Choi.

They all look lovely but I'm not sure what's the best way to cook them!

Ideas please you lovely lot.
Located in Royston, North Herts.

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Unusual greens
« on: November 08, 2018, 08:43:41 »

galina

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Re: Unusual greens
« Reply #1 on: November 08, 2018, 09:13:16 »
Spinach steam lightly.  Maybe look at eggs Florentine for brunch. 
https://www.bbc.com/food/recipes/eggsflorentine_88979

Chinese Cabbage I like best as a salad substitute.  It is robust enough for a main meal winter salad, tossed with hot ingredients, like boiled, sliced potatoes or hot baked beans.  Well cut up and reheated left overs of many kinds can be tossed into finely sliced, dressed Chinese Cabbage.  I halve the large leaves lengthwise, then slice across finely, toss with a dressing of your choice, then add heated whatever needs using up, toss again and serve immediately.  I also like it shredded with fresh tomatoes as a cold salad.  The large leaves are perfect for roll ups of all sorts.  And of course the classic stir fry benefits from a last minute addition of Chinese cabbage, a quick stir, soy sauce on top and serve.

Bok Choy is a bit more robust and best suited as a lightly cooked vegetable.  It can be halved lengthwise, steamed and served with sauce, somewhat reminiscent of asparagus with bechamel sauce.  It benefits from being cooked lightlly to keep some of the texture.  But it is also very good with any tomato sauces or indeed in a Bolognese with mince and tomatoes.  And again it is one of the classic stir fry veg.

:wave:

 
« Last Edit: November 08, 2018, 09:15:51 by galina »

Bill Door

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Re: Unusual greens
« Reply #2 on: November 08, 2018, 09:20:36 »
well done you.  Spinach is best wilted for a few minutes,in a small amount of water, tablespoon to an egg cupful. Drain the water off, it will be more than you put in.  chop up the hot spinach and dribble over olive oil and eat.  You might find the spinach needs cooking for  longer(or shorter) for your taste.  The Kale you can cook the same way but for a bit longer.  I usually add a teaspoon of carraway seeds with the kale cold, to add a different taste.  For the cabbage and bok choi stir fry after slicing them into quarters.  Add your own stir fry sauce and "protein".
I don't add salt but suggest you add that to the water before adding the spinach if you really need it.

Enjoy
Bill

Plot 18

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Re: Unusual greens
« Reply #3 on: November 08, 2018, 11:12:12 »
I grow spinach for small leaves in salad and the larger ones for making Spanakopita.

The others I use in stir fries with a sauce or cook the same way as radicchio
http://www.foodnetwork.co.uk/recipes/seared-radicchio-with-balsamic-and-parmesan.html?utm_source=foodnetwork.com&utm_medium=domestic

tricia

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Re: Unusual greens
« Reply #4 on: November 08, 2018, 11:39:36 »
I make crisps in the microwave with Cavolo Nero - the only kale I grow. Cut down along the rib, discard and cut the kale into crisp size pieces. Arrange in a single layer on a dinner plate, season with a sprinkling of salt (or spices) and microwave for about 4 to 5 minutes depending on m.w. wattage. They make a great snack!

Tricia :wave:

Obelixx

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Re: Unusual greens
« Reply #5 on: November 08, 2018, 22:07:40 »
As ever, plenty of recipes on BBC Good Food and BBC Food which have lots of Chinese and Thai recipes and some Vietnamese and Korean ones too.   Failing that, steamed whole or sliced up and stir fried is always good.
Obxx - Vendée France

cambourne7

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Re: Unusual greens
« Reply #6 on: November 09, 2018, 17:06:30 »
sadly my pak choi all went funny while i was away it looked fine before i went now looks like its finished :(

squeezyjohn

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Re: Unusual greens
« Reply #7 on: November 09, 2018, 23:45:51 »
I love how fast some of these oriental greens are Annie ... some others to consider for a winter greens bed are mustard greens, mizuna, and tatsoi.  As for cooking they are too delicate to boil, but most are great in salads and if you want to use them to accompany a warm dish (and you have enough) then you can stir fry a mixture of them with just light seasoning and maybe some onion or garlic to serve as a vegetable.  I've taken to planting up a couple of winter beds that mix these things with some winter lettuce, claytonia, land cress, rocket and other salady things.  If you give it some simple protection it will even get through the worst frosts, I put on the same kind of netting that I use to see off cabbage white butterflies (which was originally to deter rabbits) and it is enough to stave off the worst winds and frosts to keep the winter beds growing through to March. 

AnnieD

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Re: Unusual greens
« Reply #8 on: November 10, 2018, 23:23:58 »
Thanks all, some great suggestions there.
Located in Royston, North Herts.

small

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Re: Unusual greens
« Reply #9 on: November 11, 2018, 17:23:22 »
Spinach, eat the young leaves raw in a cheese sandwich. I never bother cooking it any more. Nice in a mixed salad with lettuce, rocket and young chard leaves too.

 

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