Author Topic: Worm farming.  (Read 399 times)

Plot69

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Worm farming.
« on: October 18, 2018, 12:21:34 »
Do worms count as kept animals? Either way I set three worm bins up today. Two purpose made that I've had for a few years with various degrees of failure, the other is a big bin I had laying about. I've done a lot more research this time and determined to succeed.
Tony.

Sow it, grow it, eat it.

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Worm farming.
« on: October 18, 2018, 12:21:34 »

ancellsfarmer

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Re: Worm farming.
« Reply #1 on: October 18, 2018, 19:00:40 »
Are you going for 'tea', castings or population? Perhaps the clue is bins with taps !, the other perhaps for breeding. Is your target species Brandlings or earthworms?
What did you discover before that you will not be repeating?
Currently my actions have been mainly in feeding (by mulching), beds. This has resulted in observations of 'huge' concentrations of worms. (As in plenty not large!). They have done a good job; so much so that I feel guilty in taking some fishing.
One of my projects this winter is to harvest a dedicated breeding for fishing stock, therefore interested in your experiences.
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Plot69

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Re: Worm farming.
« Reply #2 on: October 20, 2018, 18:25:54 »
All of the above to be honest. Except Earthworms, if you mean the big juicy lobworm type. You can't keep them in a bin or tub as they have a different purpose. Their job is to burrow deep aerating the soil while the compost worms, brandlings and dendrobaenas live in the top 6 inches and they're the ones used for composting.

I kept them outside before and they either got waterlogged, succumb to winter weather or dried out too much. They're all doing well so far, none have absconded and they seem happy. I've done a lot more research this time so hopefully have more success.
Tony.

Sow it, grow it, eat it.

ancellsfarmer

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Re: Worm farming.
« Reply #3 on: October 20, 2018, 19:06:04 »
Having enthused about Digeroo's keyhole garden, of African origins,(SEE recent topic), my intention is to combine these ideas with a double (bin inside a bin) experiment, composting "nasties" such as invasive weeds, green potatoes, kitchen waste, poulterers offal,fish waste etc, all securely locked down in a bin within weldmesh ,with lid. The 'juices' to be captured via worm proof strainer into a lower bin with tap, and a overflow into the raised bed containing the above. I have a suitable remote site with a gradient that will enable access for filling/draining, gravity distributing 'juices into the planted area. Intended crop year 1 will be courgettes and squash.
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Plot69

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Re: Worm farming.
« Reply #4 on: October 22, 2018, 14:09:17 »
All good except the offal part. You're not supposed to feed worms animal flesh, they're vegetarian. So the fish and chicken is not really a good idea.
Tony.

Sow it, grow it, eat it.

lottie lou

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Re: Worm farming.
« Reply #5 on: October 22, 2018, 18:27:33 »
Ancels are you trying a version of bokashi composting without the bokashi? Do you intend to do an anaerobic pike or allow it to be aerobic

ancellsfarmer

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Re: Worm farming.
« Reply #6 on: October 22, 2018, 18:57:44 »
All good except the offal part. You're not supposed to feed worms animal flesh, they're vegetarian. So the fish and chicken is not really a good idea.
Ancels are you trying a version of bokashi composting without the bokashi? Do you intend to do an anaerobic pike or allow it to be aerobic

I appreciate your input. I am needing to resolve an issue with the disposal of feathers, offal and fish skin,bones,heads etc, which are now not welcomed in the general refuse bin.The quantities are not great, but subject to hunting success. I think the answer may be a third bin,for initial breakdown with straw and litter. This is the standard commercial model where burial is not permitted.Foxes and vermin must not be encouraged.
 This phase should take 3-4 weeks, and if ratios of feedstock are correct, then the resultant material could be used directly on crops.
It may also be used to provide carbon and nitrogen in the standard composting technique, having already reached a high temperature in the initial process (Target 160 deg F) Worms do not feature in the high temp stage, they will thrive in the rich second stage, producing mineral rich  liquor while active. The solid material resulting  to remain in the bin(Periodically removed,perhaps)
An experimental project at this time.
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ancellsfarmer

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Re: Worm farming.
« Reply #7 on: October 23, 2018, 19:17:57 »
Ancels are you trying a version of bokashi composting without the bokashi? Do you intend to do an anaerobic pike or allow it to be aerobic
Having read more about 'bokashi', I think this is the same as the process I have found elsewhere. The 'bokashi' marketing is to sell the'bokashi' inoculant; which is made up of anaerobic microbes, yeasts etc used  in silage making and yoghurt. My original research suggested using 'dairy sweepings' and 'chicken litter'; which may well give a similar result  but within budget.Thanks for your interest. Reports to follow.
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lottie lou

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Re: Worm farming.
« Reply #8 on: October 24, 2018, 08:30:37 »
I read somewhere you could make your own using fermented skimmed milk and newspaper.  I dud start but lost interest however when I get round ti attempting to make greek style yoghurt I will use the whey to give it a bash.

ancellsfarmer

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Re: Worm farming.
« Reply #9 on: October 25, 2018, 18:58:45 »
Current recipe suggests horse bran, molasses and stagnant pond water, all resonably cheap and readily available in N E Hampshire !
Freelance cultivator qualified within the University of Life.

 

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