Author Topic: Help  (Read 443 times)

lottie lou

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Help
« on: June 09, 2018, 09:24:39 »
Since my neighbour acqured a dog, it had been confined to back garden,  unfortunely the dog wishing to get out learnt that he could rip my lap fence panels to escape.  Each time I had to replace the panel until every one had been changed at my own expense to a tune of almost 200.  I have never received an apology and the only comment I have had from the neighbour was "the new fence is better than the one you had".  He has now started to let his dog into the entry separating our two houses where there are approximately 10 lap panels.  I have just noticed that one panel has been ripped and something put un front of it to stop the dog escaping.  The neighbour is renting the property and I have no idea who the landlord is.   Any ideas on what to do.  Its not only the cost of the panels in the entry I am concerned about but also the labour costs as my husband has dementia and cannot do any repairs plus we are both pensioners.  Any suggestions would be gratefully received.

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Help
« on: June 09, 2018, 09:24:39 »

Tee Gee

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Re: Help
« Reply #1 on: June 09, 2018, 15:44:16 »
You could try ringing the RSPCA and explain your predicament and to be quite honest the dogs predicament. Add to this they may know of a method/procedure to cater for such events!

galina

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Re: Help
« Reply #2 on: June 10, 2018, 05:20:00 »
I am convinced that the dog owner is responsible for any damage the dog does.   Citizens Advise Bureau can tell you for certain.  If they refuse to pay for the bills (the dog owner, not the landlord) there is the Small Claims Court for exactly those cases.  No need for solicitor or anything like that.

And I agree with TG,  it looks like this dog is neglected.

In the first instance you need photographs to prove the case.  There must be gnaw marks and the like.  Or pictures of the dog in your garden.  If the dog can get out and into your garden, the dog is a danger to the general public. 

Good luck  :wave:

caroline7758

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Re: Help
« Reply #3 on: June 11, 2018, 13:16:20 »
In my experience, as someone who has worked for Citizens Advice, neighbour disputes are very difficult to resolve. Even if you go through small claims court and win, it's difficult to get it enforced without extra cost if the other person doesn't want/can't affor to pay. Have you spoken to the neighbour? There is some info here, but probably of limited use.
https://www.gov.uk/how-to-resolve-neighbour-disputes/

You could also contact your local Age UK as they may have a handyman scheme which might help you get it fixed more cheaply.

cambourne7

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Re: Help
« Reply #4 on: June 12, 2018, 08:27:31 »
Over an above trying to get them to pay for the damage and mediation. On a more practical level what about covering there side with chicken wire which might protect the wood. Has the dog ever attacked you? Is it violent?

lottie lou

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Re: Help
« Reply #5 on: June 12, 2018, 18:41:12 »
Not attempting to get neighbour to pay, just want a  "sorry"  which I won' t get.  Decided to get chicken wire as you have suggested.  OH just wants a quiet life.

cambourne7

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Re: Help
« Reply #6 on: June 12, 2018, 19:05:26 »
hope it works xx

pumpkinlover

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Re: Help
« Reply #7 on: June 13, 2018, 07:23:02 »
Sorry that you are having this trouble Lottie lou.
It is an awkward  situation and difficult to know the best solution with people who have no sense of what is right behavior.