Author Topic: beetroot  (Read 757 times)

ber77tie

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beetroot
« on: September 25, 2017, 13:08:49 »
I may not be posting in the right place but I still have a lot of beetroot in the soil.Is there anything I can do to eat at a later date such as freezing? I am not a fan of pickled beetroot.

caroline7758

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Re: beetroot
« Reply #1 on: September 25, 2017, 14:03:28 »

Tee Gee

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Re: beetroot
« Reply #2 on: September 25, 2017, 14:26:30 »
They can be buried in boxes and covered with spent compost (or similar) then kept in a frost free environment.

Although I have not done it I guess they can be buried in the greenhouse border once you have emptied the greenhouse.

Basically treat them like farmers do with  Potatoes,Turnips Swedes where they bury them in clamps.

see example  here:https://www.rodalesorganiclife.com/garden/low-energy-way-keep-root-veggies-fresh

johhnyco15

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Re: beetroot
« Reply #3 on: September 25, 2017, 16:08:35 »
boxes of damp sand layer of sand place beetroot on sand making sure they dont touch cover with sand then repeat only store a1 beetroots as any that are damaged will rot hope this helps
johhnyc015  may the plot be with you

compothefirst

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Re: beetroot
« Reply #4 on: September 25, 2017, 16:23:04 »
I am not a fan of picked beetroot either, but this a recipe that the whole family loves http://growingandgathering.com/preserved-beetroot/
It gets eaten as fast as I can make it, in preference to plain beetroot. (must be the sugar!)


pumpkinlover

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Re: beetroot
« Reply #5 on: September 26, 2017, 07:00:02 »
I am not a fan of picked beetroot either, but this a recipe that the whole family loves http://growingandgathering.com/preserved-beetroot/
It gets eaten as fast as I can make it, in preference to plain beetroot. (must be the sugar!)



The recipe I use is similar to above the sugar does seem to make a difference.
Mr PKL especially enjoys beetroot sandwiches, the acidity of normal pickled beetroot not being a problem.



Obelixx

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Re: beetroot
« Reply #6 on: September 26, 2017, 08:14:59 »
I loathe pickled beetroot too but love it in this relish recipe - http://www.taste.com.au/recipes/beetroot-relish-2/1ba62cce-b368-4208-8144-5e9b8c3c9c34

We also like it cooked with onions, tomatoes and cumin - Madhur Jaffrey's recipe - or baked with butter beans in cream and horesradish and with a light crumble topping of toasted breadcrumbs.

This year I'm going to try this relish recipe:-

1kg raw beetroot, peeled and coarsely minced or grated
50g fresh ginger, peeled and grated
4 lemons, grated zest and juice
800g sugar
100g blanched, slivered almonds

Put the beetroot in a pan with just enough water to cover and cook gently for about an hour.  Add the ginger, lemon zest and juice with the sugar and heat through, stirring till all the sugar is dissolved.   Remove from th eheat.  Stir in the almonds and then pot and seal in sterilised jars.
Obxx - Vendée France

galina

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Re: beetroot
« Reply #7 on: September 26, 2017, 09:01:21 »
You can twist the tops off when frost threatens and store the roots in sand in frost-free conditions.  Pretty much like carrots.  Just have to keep rodents out.  :wave:

ACE

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Re: beetroot
« Reply #8 on: September 26, 2017, 10:38:42 »
Said it before and I'll say it again, once tasted you will always make it for a dip, relish on any savoury sarnie.   Chrain.   https://leitesculinaria.com/85022/recipes-homemade-chrain.html

tricia

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Re: beetroot
« Reply #9 on: September 26, 2017, 14:48:10 »
Thanks for that ACE! I fancied some beetroot and bought a pack of ready cooked ones yesterday (don't grow them in my small garden) so your link has come just at the right time to try something new to me. Sounds delicious  :happy7:.

Tricia  :wave:

ber77tie

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Re: beetroot
« Reply #10 on: October 11, 2017, 19:50:09 »
Hi,been away for awhile and came back to all these ideas.Thanks everybody.

Beersmith

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Re: beetroot
« Reply #11 on: October 11, 2017, 21:51:30 »
Take a risk and leave some of it in the ground. I usually do this and am often able just to pick it when needed up until Christmas and beyond. Mine does not seem to get woody until regrowth restarts in the spring.

There is a lot of sense in not putting all your eggs in one basket. Early frosts and a bad winter and my advice would be worthless. But a mild autumn and early winter and my advice would mean delicious fresh beetroot, rather than pickled,  for several months yet to come.

But don't rely on just one Idea. Vary your options.
Not mad, just out to mulch!

antipodes

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Re: beetroot
« Reply #12 on: October 13, 2017, 10:02:50 »
Here in France you don't eat pickled beetroot (which I think is vile) but just cooked beetroot in a variety of sauces. So if you want to eat it like that, you can just preserve them 'au nature', scrub and parboil or pressure cook (my preferred method) for 10 minutes, then peel and slice or cube. pack into sterile jars, make a solution of boiling water, with some salt and some sugar (aim for about a teaspoon of each per jar), fill and tightly close the jar and boil as you would to sterilize (about 25-30 minutes I find).  You can then eat it in salads with dressing, hot with cream sauces or even in soup if you like borscht :-)
2012 - Snow in February, non-stop rain till July. Blight and rot are rife. Thieving voles cause strife. But first runner beans and lots of greens. Follow an English allotment in urban France: http://roos-and-camembert.blogspot.com

pumpkinlover

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Re: beetroot
« Reply #13 on: October 13, 2017, 16:59:34 »
Never heard of chrain but it sounds like one to try.



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Re: beetroot
« Reply #13 on: October 13, 2017, 16:59:34 »