Author Topic: Apple tree woes  (Read 2399 times)

Digeroo

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Apple tree woes
« on: September 18, 2016, 13:08:25 »
I have a young apple tree this is it second year with me.  Did well last year.  But this year it became completely covered with blackflies,  the end of each branch was caked with them.  And the leaves became gnarled and brittle and stopped growing.
Sprayed with Fairy and nettle tea and there is now a small amount of new growth beyond, no sign now of aphids or the ant farmers. 

Is this a problem with the type of apple.  Should I simply get rid of it?  Other apples close by totally unaffected.  And when I mean near on tree is only a couple of meters away.

It had 13 apples but most have disappeared.  Not clear where they went.  Things do disappear on our site, but who would want a small under-ripe apple from a tree covered in aphids. 

Allotments 4 All

Apple tree woes
« on: September 18, 2016, 13:08:25 »

johhnyco15

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Re: Apple tree woes
« Reply #1 on: September 18, 2016, 14:14:54 »
i would keep the tree water it well mulch it and next season spray for blackfly early to give it a chance and see what happends 
johhnyc015  may the plot be with you

gwynleg

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Re: Apple tree woes
« Reply #2 on: September 18, 2016, 15:59:24 »
I have a late invasion of black fly on lots of things - runners, sweetcorn and flowers so wonder if there is something about the weather that has encouraged them more generally now. Fortunately I also seem to have a bit of a mob of ladybirds too who have started to tuck in. Not sure what will happen with the cooler weather now though.

penedesenca

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Re: Apple tree woes
« Reply #3 on: September 19, 2016, 05:54:19 »
I would give it a chance. I had one plum tree affected badly this year but it was young and sappy. It also had a promising crop but due to the blackfly it aborted the lot. Unfortunately it happens. As already said just give it some tlc over winter - a feed/mulch etc.

Digeroo

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Re: Apple tree woes
« Reply #4 on: September 19, 2016, 14:23:59 »
Thanks for your advice.  Good idea I will give it a yellow card and if it does not behave itself I will send it off!!   


ancellsfarmer

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Re: Apple tree woes
« Reply #5 on: September 19, 2016, 18:27:25 »
If your aphids were being farmed by ants, they (the ants ) could be stopped with sticky glue bands around the trunk. Black fly can FLY!, but ants engaged in farming do not. (OnLY FLY when breeding). Apply in autumn for codling moth, and in spring for other pests. Replace if dusty or grass strewn.
Freelance cultivator qualified within the University of Life.

Digeroo

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Re: Apple tree woes
« Reply #6 on: September 20, 2016, 07:30:45 »
I like the idea of a sticky band to deter the ants.  Will do.  Thanks.   

I just do not understand why they chose one apple tree when there were three others to choose from and a plum.  None of these had even one black fly.  All within easy flying distance and ant crawling distance.  And the nearly hedge was several crabs.

The tip of each branch was completely caked in black, never seen anything like it.

Vinlander

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Re: Apple tree woes
« Reply #7 on: September 27, 2016, 13:46:35 »
I like the idea of a sticky band to deter the ants.  Will do.  Thanks.   

I just do not understand why they chose one apple tree when there were three others to choose from and a plum.  None of these had even one black fly.  All within easy flying distance and ant crawling distance.  And the nearly hedge was several crabs.

The tip of each branch was completely caked in black, never seen anything like it.

Aphids love tender growth - young trees are growing so fast there's lots of it, but older trees tend to slow down so even though there's more fresh tips they might not be as tender.

You don't say what the variety is - eg.Cox's Orange Pippin is notorious for needing a constant spray routine to keep it healthy.

It's worth consulting the RHS AGM list - it has to be reliable and resistant to get on it - although they give too many points for yield and not enough for flavour - unfortunately it wouldn't open for me and the list of apples at https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?PID=331 is incomplete because the best of all is missing - Ashmeads Kernel AGM.

Cheers.
With a microholding you always get too much or bugger-all. (I'm fed up calling it an allotment garden - it just encourages the tidy-police).

The simple/complex split is more & more important: Simple fertilisers Poor, complex ones Good. Simple (old) poisons predictable, others (new) the opposite.

saddad

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Re: Apple tree woes
« Reply #8 on: September 28, 2016, 19:58:01 »
It is very young... so give it at least one more year...