Author Topic: Climbing roses into trees  (Read 2567 times)

100mph

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Climbing roses into trees
« on: November 05, 2012, 16:37:55 »
Seeing lots of cheap roses in the various bargain shops at the moment, and the RHS website suggests they can be planted now.
I have a very dull lime tree (and I wish it wasn't there but I'm not allowed to touch it) at the southern end of my N-S oriented plot, and obviously the tree throws a lot of shade. So, in an effort to be more interesting than just a lime tree I'm considering planting a climbing rose with the intent that the rose will do its thing amongst the branches. Does anyone have experience of this? I see two options for planting: close to the bole or on the dripline. Issues I see: close in: lots of roots, hard to dig enough - hacking through tree roots and all) and challenging to ensure the rose gets off to a good start what with competition from the tree which does a very good job of keeping the ground there very dry. On the dripline the challenge will be to get the rose into the branches. I don't have a lot of space to the south to put the rose in either.
Can anyone relate experiences of either, or both, planting ideas, please, and which would  you recommend?
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Climbing roses into trees
« on: November 05, 2012, 16:37:55 »

ACE

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Re: Climbing roses into trees
« Reply #1 on: November 06, 2012, 11:43:48 »
I have done it a few time now all with good results. You need a very vigorous rose like Rambling Rector or  Pauls Himalyan Musk. A nice big  planting hole filled with some well rotted manure will see it through a few years then a regular top dressing to help it compete with the tree. If  you plant about a yard away on the shade side you will avoid the big roots  and it will make it reach for the light,train it up a long cane back into the tree. The Himalyan musk has a really heady smell on a still evening and is my favourite. If you know of one local get some hardwood cuttings about 18 to 20 inches long and stick them in the ground about  9 inches to a foot where they will not be disturbed until you are ready to transplant them. Another good plant to put on the sunny side is a grape vine, the grapes do not make much but what does come attracts the birds and squirrels. Apart from using the sunny side of the tree the same planting methods apply.

Unwashed

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Re: Climbing roses into trees
« Reply #2 on: November 06, 2012, 12:08:41 »
Roses climbing into trees was the thing that most impressed me with Hyde Hall - though that was getting on 20 years ago, but I imagine it's still much the same.  Actually, they climbed roses into trees, and then climbed clematis in the roses.  They're not a million miles from you, perhaps you could take a day trip and see what they do.
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Paulines7

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Re: Climbing roses into trees
« Reply #3 on: November 06, 2012, 12:33:58 »
Ace, Pauls Himalayan Musk sounds a lovely rose to have.  We are also thinking of buying one or two to climb up a tree and over our summer house. 

Where is the best place to get them please?  David Austin costs about 20 with postage.  Van Meuwen are a bit cheaper but would the extra postage be worth paying to get one from David Austin whose roses always seem to be top class? 

ACE

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Re: Climbing roses into trees
« Reply #4 on: November 06, 2012, 13:12:54 »
Try Pococks, just down the road from you at Romsey, I have always had good stuff from them. They have a website but worth ringing before you go just to check.

http://www.garden-roses.co.uk/

Robert_Brenchley

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Re: Climbing roses into trees
« Reply #5 on: November 06, 2012, 19:07:28 »
You need to match the rose to the tree. I have Zephirine Droughin growing through a lilac, and both are flourishing. I wouldn't plant Rambling Rector under something that size, or Zephirine under an ancient oak for that matter. A lime's likely to be a fair size, so you'll need something strong growing - a rambler not a climber.

woodypecks

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Re: Climbing roses into trees
« Reply #6 on: November 11, 2012, 10:10:19 »
I have a Paul's Scarlet growing up my cherry tree ..they are a perfect match . I have a massive pine tree up which I planted a Rosa filipes Kiftsgate about six years ago , it is very slow but is now begining to climb and spread up the trunk and will be really spectacular when it gets to the top branches ....something to look forward to .    :coffee2:
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100mph

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Re: Climbing roses into trees
« Reply #7 on: November 18, 2012, 20:40:57 »
Thank you for all the replies.
This seems to be quite a complex decision to make. I think I'll hold fire until spring as the local nursery has suggested that they'll have a much better stock range then and 'spring planted roses do much better than autumn if the winter is hard'.
I'll see if I can remember how to measure the height of the tree (I'm sure a webpage can remind me) and in the meantime make a start by getting a planting hole dug and manured - I'm favouring a 'close to the trunk' approach at the moment although that might change just before I start digging!
My Suffolk allotment is a fine example of 'how not to do it'.
Muddling through with excessive effort for minimal return from 4 rods since 2008.