Author Topic: honeysuckle  (Read 4757 times)

rdak

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honeysuckle
« on: February 20, 2004, 13:44:00 »
I would like to grow honeysuckle horizontally across several 5 foot fence panels- does this sound do-able...I know nothing about climbing plants. Would it be OK to stretch wire across the fence or would I need to have a trellis? thanks

Also, would like a white honeysuckle- can anyone recommend a good variety?
« Last Edit: January 01, 1970, 01:00:00 by 1077926400 »

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honeysuckle
« on: February 20, 2004, 13:44:00 »

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Re: honeysuckle
« Reply #1 on: February 20, 2004, 16:52:23 »
It is perfectly possible to grow honesuckle in this way. I have one growing on wires set up for climbing roses, and the plants are quite happy to twine around the wires, though you may need to 'get involved' more than when using trelis. The plant may on occasions need tying in to the wire , and may need more regular pruning to remove stems growing in the wrong direction. Plus of course will need training towards the wires in the early years. Apart from this no problem.

As to varieties, I cant be much help as i dont grow many different ones.  A good vigourous variety that i have had sucess with is Lonicera japonica (Halliana?) a evergreen/ semi evergreen type that white (fading to yellow) flowers. Not particularly fragrant but good for an informal location.  I also have a cultivar of the native honeysuckle , which i have not yet got to flower and have only tried on trelis. 'Belgica' or 'Serotina' (not sure which exactly).  Has attracive foliage, deciduous and is supposed to have red flowers.

Hope this helps a bit.  :-/  :)
« Last Edit: January 01, 1970, 01:00:00 by 1077926400 »

rdak

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Re: honeysuckle
« Reply #2 on: February 20, 2004, 17:00:55 »
it does- thanks Richard!
« Last Edit: January 01, 1970, 01:00:00 by 1077926400 »

Palustris

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Re: honeysuckle
« Reply #3 on: February 20, 2004, 20:50:40 »
L. japonica is white flowered, but it is very very rampant and does not flower well in colder areas.
« Last Edit: January 01, 1970, 01:00:00 by 1077926400 »
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Re: honeysuckle
« Reply #4 on: February 20, 2004, 22:20:18 »
Quote
L. japonica is white flowered, but it is very very rampant and does not flower well in colder areas.


Yes i know its rampant /vigorous Eric, buthat can be an asset as well as a burden. Still like it all the same, perhaps because it is the first plant i grew from cuttings as a child. That may sound strange but it grew in the garden i grew up in and roots well from cuttings, so not a daft a 'first plant' as it may seem.  Strangely enough when my interest in gardening reawoke when I moved to   my current home, one of the first things i took as cuttings was the good old L japonica, which was growing almost wild in this garden at the time.

By the way the flowere are white mainly but as they age they do fade to yellow, producing a mixture of white and yellow flowers which is quite charming.
« Last Edit: January 01, 1970, 01:00:00 by 1077926400 »

Palustris

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Re: honeysuckle
« Reply #5 on: February 22, 2004, 13:59:52 »
L. capriifolia is cream coloured and easy. L Graham Thomas is also cream, fading to pale yellow, vigorous and very floriferous and highly scented.  Unless there are modern selections, not mentioned in my books I cannot find any pure white Honeysuckles which are easily available.
« Last Edit: January 01, 1970, 01:00:00 by 1077926400 »
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Re: honeysuckle
« Reply #6 on: February 22, 2004, 17:41:59 »
Eric.

I may have gotten a little confused about the flowers on the honeysuckle. It may be that it flowers yellow fading to white. It is hard to be clear in the middle of winter, months since you last saw the plant in flower (lol).

It is an old variety which I do not know the  name of.
Though having said this it COULD be L japonica 'Graham Thomas' as your description sounds about right. 'Halliana' is another similar one is it not?

You have clearly done some research on this, which iam sure we all appreciate.

richard
« Last Edit: January 01, 1970, 01:00:02 by -1 »

 

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