Author Topic: Manure  (Read 3469 times)

ncd72

  • Not So New ...
  • *
  • Posts: 29
Manure
« on: October 15, 2010, 15:48:38 »
Hi all - i've got some horse manure bagged up (quite a bit) and i've had it 2-3 months - is it better to put it on the plot now its dug over and let the autumn/winter weather, worms etc do its stuff, or should i let it rot down and throw it on next year.

This is really confusing me as i keep hearing different ideas about the rotted/non rotted methods.

Any help gteatly appreciated

thanks in advance

Amazingrotavator(Derby)

  • Half Acre
  • ***
  • Posts: 202
  • My best mate
    • www.mandjderbygardens.co.uk
Re: Manure
« Reply #1 on: October 15, 2010, 16:16:16 »
Spread it all over and let it over winter then dig in in spring. I always do.

goodlife

  • Hectare
  • *****
  • Posts: 7,862
Re: Manure
« Reply #2 on: October 15, 2010, 16:30:55 »
Any manure spread now will loose lot of it's 'nutrients' during winter..all that rain we get will wash it away...however...manure will improve the structure of the soil..rotted or un-rotted.
If you keep it untill early spring and then spread/dig it in then your manure will still have the fertiliser effect too for the crops.
Neither way is not wrong it is just matter what you are trying to achieve and when you are able to do the job.
If there is lot of straw in you manure it maybe good idea to deal with it earlier than later..it will take longer for worms to work.
Heavier clay soils will benefit dealing with manure early too as it maybe too cold and heavy to work in early in the year.

Sally A

  • Half Acre
  • ***
  • Posts: 132
Re: Manure
« Reply #3 on: October 15, 2010, 16:41:00 »
I've spread a couple of bags of fresh over the garden where the broad beans (150 ish) will be planted in a few weeks.  Also sprinkled some in the garlic bed before planting - am a bit worried now as some says yes, others say no - luckily it was only a sprinkle not a 6 inch deep manure-fest.  Have put a few bags by, for when I dig out the climbing beans, and I'll start a new bean trench for next year.

Having recently sorted out my dalek composters, and taken all the good stuff out - have layered the fresh manure with the partly broken down compost, grass cuttings etc.  The daleks are warm to hug, so plan to use this for spring crops, tomato tubs, spuds.

Fresh muck is better than no muck but use it sparingly and let the worms do their job overwinter.

ncd72

  • Not So New ...
  • *
  • Posts: 29
Re: Manure
« Reply #4 on: October 15, 2010, 17:16:40 »
Thanks for that  - so if its not rotted now then just throw it on.

thanks all

sunloving

  • Hectare
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,080
  • Halifax
Re: Manure
« Reply #5 on: October 16, 2010, 09:12:59 »
Hi

I agree with goodlife about the nutrient loss but its really useful to get it doing its good work over winter and have beds ready to go in spring.

I ve got mine spread ont he beds and then have them covered with black plastic this allows the worms to do their stuff and reduces any nutient loss via the rain.

Anything you can do to get ahead in the winter i would do .

good luck, ultimately either way your soil is going to benifit from have the manure so dont worry about it just do it!!

good luck
x sunloving

ncd72

  • Not So New ...
  • *
  • Posts: 29
Re: Manure
« Reply #6 on: October 16, 2010, 10:57:09 »
Ta very much - all very helpful!

Thanks Again

chriscross1966

  • Hectare
  • *****
  • Posts: 3,658
  • Visionhairy
Re: Manure
« Reply #7 on: October 16, 2010, 23:52:00 »
Horse manure doesn't have a lot of nutrients really, so I tend to treat it as a soil improver and rely on BFB and chickern pellets for the nutrients. If you've got stupidly heavy clay right at the top of your soil you want to dig it and leave it rough without manuring until spring, anything else and I'd be manuring it as I dug over (and rotavating it in and get sopme more in thered in the spring. Don't manure your carrot bed, though giving it the sapent compost from tomatoes etc is a good idea...

chrisc

pigeonseed

  • Hectare
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,787
  • Hastings
Re: Manure
« Reply #8 on: October 17, 2010, 14:30:47 »
Quote
Horse manure doesn't have a lot of nutrients really, so I tend to treat it as a soil improver and rely on BFB and chickern pellets for the nutrients.

 :'( :'( Doesn't it?

I've just spent all morning carrying extremely heavy sacks of it up and down hills to my plot.  :'( :'(

I'm not allowed to swear on here, am I?

beanie3

  • Half Acre
  • ***
  • Posts: 228
Re: Manure
« Reply #9 on: October 17, 2010, 19:28:04 »
How much manure do you need?  If its fresh - is there a simple sum for how much is needed per square foot?


pigeonseed

  • Hectare
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,787
  • Hastings
Re: Manure
« Reply #10 on: October 17, 2010, 20:16:02 »
People seem to use very different quanitities, I've never come across a fixed amount for it.

I've heard people on here describe loading quantities onto their plot which make the mind boggle. Whereas I just can't get much of it to my plot. So I apply it very locally for some things like shallots and onions, and more liberally for squash. That's it.

I suppose the fact that it's not very concentrated means it's safe to put a lot of it on (of the well-rotted stuff) So you probably can't put too much on, and you can do without if needed. Some don't use it at all.

so it's up to you I suppose. How much do you currently use beanie3? And do you feel you need more?

beanie3

  • Half Acre
  • ***
  • Posts: 228
Re: Manure
« Reply #11 on: October 17, 2010, 20:27:43 »
i dont use any.  The first full year at my allotment (okay i call it my allotment but its really a friend of ours i loan a part of his field).  I don't have easy access to manure - could pick up a few sacks of horse manure (although can't in my car its on finance!)

But i wondered if a little is better than nothing - or just not bother.....?!?!?!

Digeroo

  • Hectare
  • *****
  • Posts: 7,608
  • Cotswolds - Gravel - Alkaline
Re: Manure
« Reply #12 on: October 17, 2010, 20:44:52 »
It is still worth testing manure from a new source before spreading around too generally.  We have had a run in with AP and someone has sourced some horse manure instead.  But a test pot of broad beans showed that also has issues.

If there are any remains of herbicides in the manure they break down when well mixed with soil. 

pigeonseed

  • Hectare
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,787
  • Hastings
Re: Manure
« Reply #13 on: October 17, 2010, 21:15:21 »
Oh no that's bad luck, digeroo. I'm sticking with my usual riding stables now, I don't have problems with aminopyralid thank goodness.

If you can get some, it will still be useful, beanie3. If you have a very small amount available, give it to a 'priority plant' - a greedy plant, and one you love!

If you put well-rotted manure in sacks, it doesn't smell, and is very dry. In the end it becomes like soil. So you can probably safely put it in a car boot.  But it depends on what you have access to I suppose - maybe you can only get hold of fresh manure!

Compost is great as well, so they say. I guess you have a compost heap? That will help your plants out.

wilstanstud

  • Not So New ...
  • *
  • Posts: 7
Re: Manure
« Reply #14 on: October 20, 2010, 08:41:14 »
I have plenty of manure available in Liverpool if anyone needs any.
Please email me on ashleigh.byrne@pershing.co.uk

 :)

pigeonseed

  • Hectare
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,787
  • Hastings
Re: Manure
« Reply #15 on: October 20, 2010, 20:40:49 »
I'll have it if you deliver to Hastings!  ;D ;D ;D

wilstanstud

  • Not So New ...
  • *
  • Posts: 7
Re: Manure
« Reply #16 on: October 22, 2010, 08:32:08 »
No can do sorry :(

TheJerseyBean

  • Not So New ...
  • *
  • Posts: 5
Re: Manure
« Reply #17 on: November 01, 2010, 21:24:02 »
It does not matter if is rotted or not just leave it on the survace till spring, i have
just topped mine with manure and seaweed as I am only 5 mins from the beach were there is mountains of it

Allotments 4 All

Re: Manure
« Reply #17 on: November 01, 2010, 21:24:02 »