Author Topic: Rooting Powder  (Read 2022 times)

InfraDig

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Rooting Powder
« on: July 01, 2016, 11:56:57 »
Does anybody know what is in Organic Rooting Powder? Does it work? What about non organic rooting powder? Is it worth using rooting powder at all?
Thanks.

ancellsfarmer

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Re: Rooting Powder
« Reply #1 on: July 01, 2016, 19:19:20 »
Probably acetic acid(as in vinegar) for "rooting", used to have captan as fungicide, but organic would not I think. Believe captan is not for home use these days. It is said that a good medium for striking cuttings is wallpaper paste such as polycell or solvite.This is essentially potato starch, with added fungicide! What is your requirement to propagate?
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InfraDig

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Re: Rooting Powder
« Reply #2 on: July 03, 2016, 14:48:31 »
I want to propagate various shrubs: ceonothus, eleagnus, hebe, even roses. I have read about using an infusion of willow tips. I was also interested in what is in commercial products. The organic one I was looking at from JAB says absolutely nothing about the content.
Thanks for the reply.

Tee Gee

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Re: Rooting Powder
« Reply #3 on: July 03, 2016, 15:28:19 »
For what it is worth I was alway told that all that rooting powder does is cause an irritation to the tender end of a cutting, and if you use too much you can do the reverse of what you are trying to achieve because the powder becomes saturated and the cutting cant breath.

Apparently the plant reacts to the powder creating callousing which is followed by roots.

Not very scientific I know but when I grew Chrysants & Dahlias for a hobby I found very little difference between using a powder/liquid to the grit method*, in fact I usually used both methods.

*This is where you cover the rooting compost with a layer of silver sand which percolates into the hole as you push in the cutting.

The sand causes the irritation, you are ensured that the cutting is in total contact with the compost/sand and the cutting is surrounded by a free draining medium thus reducing the chances of damping off/rot

Because most hormone powders have a short shelf life (it is said it should be replaced every year) I sometimes did not bother if I was unsure of how long I had had my powder.

This is my slant on taking cuttings:

http://www.thegardenersalmanac.co.uk/Data/Cuttings/Cuttings%20-%20The%20Basics.htm


For specific types of cutting click on the 'related link' in the right hand column.

I hope you find this info useful...Tg


Obelixx

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Re: Rooting Powder
« Reply #4 on: July 03, 2016, 17:51:45 »
Very useful.  Thanks TeeGee.
Obxx - Vendée France

InfraDig

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Re: Rooting Powder
« Reply #5 on: July 04, 2016, 10:29:31 »
Many thanks TeeGee. I should have thought of that reference myself!!

Vinlander

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Re: Rooting Powder
« Reply #6 on: January 07, 2017, 14:45:26 »
I have read good things on this forum about watering with steepings from willow cuttings - search "willow hormone" (2 hits- there may be others with a better search), but I haven't  tried it yet...

The only willow within range was on my site and it got cut down just before I wanted it - it had been put in to take out excess water, but it quickly got to 30ft high, the shadow made one plot useless, and it never  made any discernable difference to the waterlogging.

There are plenty on common ground but I'd leave it until dusk!

Cheers.
With a microholding you always get too much or bugger-all. (I'm fed up calling it an allotment garden - it just encourages the tidy-police).

The simple/complex split is more & more important: Simple fertilisers Poor, complex ones Good. Simple (old) poisons predictable, others (new) the opposite.

ancellsfarmer

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Re: Rooting Powder
« Reply #7 on: January 11, 2017, 19:14:02 »
I have read good things on this forum about watering with steepings from willow cuttings - search "willow hormone" (2 hits- there may be others with a better search), but I haven't  tried it yet...

The only willow within range was on my site and it got cut down just before I wanted it - it had been put in to take out excess water, but it quickly got to 30ft high, the shadow made one plot useless, and it never  made any discernable difference to the waterlogging.

There are plenty on common ground but I'd leave it until dusk!

Cheers.

Have you been back to look? Unless the root was grubbed, its likely there is some regrowth or suckers. You cant usually just kill a willow
« Last Edit: January 11, 2017, 19:17:56 by ancellsfarmer »
Freelance cultivator qualified within the University of Life.

Allotments 4 All

Re: Rooting Powder
« Reply #7 on: January 11, 2017, 19:14:02 »